Panel Round Two More questions for the panel... Wandering Eyes.

Panel Round Two

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515948623/515966130" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

All right, time for some more questions for you about the week's news. Alexandra, new survey results released this week reveal that nearly half of all partners in committed relationships do what?

ALEXANDRA PETRI: Rue the day.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I'll give you a hint. Like, you know, when a spouse confronts the other and says, how could you? And really, with "Orange Is The New Black"?

PETRI: Ooh, is stealing the other person's playlist - oh, no, is watching the TV that they said they would watch together.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

TOM BODETT: Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It's called Netflix cheating.

PETRI: Oh.

BODETT: Ooh.

SAGAL: Yes. More than half have confessed to going ahead and watching the TV show that you're supposed to be watching with your partner, going in and binge watching it without them. Most partners only find out they've been Netflix cheated on when they've only been with one person but then they test positive for "House Of Cards."

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: Yeah, I'm afraid I have one of these troubled marriages. It started with my wife. She first cheated with "Homeland" and then moved on to "House Of Cards." And then she started "Orange Is The New Black" and I let her go.

SAGAL: Really?

BODETT: Yeah. I said, you just go ahead without me. So we're now - I guess it's an open marriage where...

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: ...We're seeing other TV shows.

SAGAL: TV shows. Yeah.

BODETT: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "YOU CAN LOOK BUT YOU BETTER NOT TOUCH")

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) You can look but you better not touch, boy. You can look but you better not touch. Mess around and you'll end up in dutch, boy. You can look but you better not, oh, no, you better not...

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.