Bob Weinstock, a Jazz Man Who Really Produced Bob Weinstock, the man behind many of the most important jazz recordings of the 1950s, died last week. Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk all recorded on Weinstock's label, Prestige. Debbie Elliott reports.
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Bob Weinstock, a Jazz Man Who Really Produced

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Bob Weinstock, a Jazz Man Who Really Produced

Bob Weinstock, a Jazz Man Who Really Produced

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DEBBIE ELLIOTT, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Debbie Elliott.

He didn't play an instrument, and he couldn't read music, but Bob Weinstock was behind some of the most important jazz of the 1950's.

(Soundbite of jazz music)

ELLIOTT: Bob Weinstock died last week at the age of 77. He was a producer who worked with John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Stan Getz, Annie Ross and other giants of the bebop and cool jazz eras. It was his childhood dream made real. Weinstock once said that his life changed the day he and his dad brought home a pile of jazz records. He was eight years old. By the time he was 15, he was buying and selling rare jazz recordings out of his family's apartment in New York City. At 18, he moved the business into a store and soon after created his own record label, Prestige.

(Soundbite of jazz singer)

ELLIOTT: Bob Weinstock preferred spontaneity to rehearsal. He asked his musicians to come to the studio and jam on tape. It may have been an especially fitting approach for a musical form that exalted experimentation and improvisation, and it resulted in some of jazz's most memorable work, including the album Cookin' with Miles Davis.

(Soundbite of jazz music)

ELLIOTT: Bob Weinstock created over 1,000 albums for Prestige. In 1972, he sold the label and moved to Florida. He died there last week from complications of diabetes.

(Soundbite of jazz music)

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