Thank Hanks For The Coffee Tom Hanks has sent the White House press corps a new espresso machine. "Keep up the good fight for Truth, Justice, and the American Way. Especially the Truth part," he wrote in a note.
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Thank Hanks For The Coffee

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Thank Hanks For The Coffee

Thank Hanks For The Coffee

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

What do you give enemies of the people? When members of the White House press corps came to work this week, they found a shiny, pricey Italian espresso machine and coffee pods with a typed note. (Reading) To the White House press corps, keep up the good fight for truth, justice and the American way, especially for the truth part, Tom Hanks.

The noted actor and one-time host of Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me has been kindly keeping the White House press corps caffeinated over the past two administrations. White House reporters, including NPR's Tamara Keith, tweeted thanks. Thank you, Tom Hanks, said Tamara. The espresso is delicious and this machine is a little more idiot proof than the last - that's important for reporters.

Traditional news business ethical guidelines usually advise reporters not to accept any gifts that can't be eaten or drunk within 24 hours. So at least the cappuccino itself would seem to apply. But be suspicious if you see a lot of reporters suddenly write that "Turner & Hooch," a 1989 film that starred Tom Hanks and Beasley the dog, deserved an Oscar.

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