James Comey Testifies Before Senate Committee In Russia Investigation NPR reviews the status of the various investigations into Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential campaign and any ties to the Trump campaign.

James Comey Testifies Before Senate Committee In Russia Investigation

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now that Comey has testified, you may be wondering what comes next.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And the answer is we don't know.

CORNISH: But leaders of the Senate intelligence committee say they will continue looking into Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election and any ties between Russia and the Trump campaign. Right now, though, they don't have any more open hearings scheduled.

SIEGEL: In Congress, there are a few other committees investigating largely the same thing. The leaders of the House intelligence committee said this week that they're going to get back on track. But the investigation that really matters is the one being led by a special counsel, former FBI Director Robert Mueller. If Mueller believes that someone broke the law, he has the authority to prosecute that person in court.

CORNISH: And it's possible that may mean that things in Congress quiet down. Witnesses, evidence and other materials that might have been examined in the open by Congress could now become part of Mueller's inquiry. James Comey responded to several of the senators' questions today by deferring to Mueller, and he said repeatedly that he has faith in Mueller's ability to get to the bottom of this.

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