Thanking Immigrants for the Myriad Jobs They Do In the noisy argument over what to do with illegal immigrants, says commentator Richard Rodriguez, the common assumption is that America has done a great deal for them already. But Rodriquez argues that no one speaks of the multitude of things these workers have done for Americans. And he think it's time to say two relevant words: thank you.
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Thanking Immigrants for the Myriad Jobs They Do

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Thanking Immigrants for the Myriad Jobs They Do

Thanking Immigrants for the Myriad Jobs They Do

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

As the debate over immigration continued in the Senate today, there's not much sign that compromise is near. Republicans are split over what to do about the 12 million illegal immigrants already in this country. Conservatives want them deported. More moderate Republicans favor allowing them to earn citizenship by learning English and paying a fine. The latest proposal would let the illegal immigrants who've been here the longest apply for green cards.

Commentator Richard Rodriguez has been listening closely to the debate over illegal immigration. He says that in all the debates and proposals, there's one thing he has yet to hear.

RICHARD RODRIGUEZ: In the noisy argument over what to do with illegal immigrants, the common assumption is that America has done a great deal for them already. The question now is what more should we give them? Should we give them a green card? Grant them amnesty? Or stop all this generosity and send them packing?

No one speaks of what illegal immigrants have done for us. It occurs to me I've not heard two relevant words spoken. If you will allow me, I will speak them.

Thank you.

Thank you for turning on the sprinklers. Thank you for cleaning the swimming pool and scrambling the eggs and doing the dishes. Thank you for making the bed. Thank you for getting the children up and ready for school. Thank you for picking them up after school. Thank you for caring for our dying parents.

Thank you for plucking dead chickens. Thank you for bending your bodies over our fields. Thank you for breathing chemicals and absorbing chemicals into your bodies. Thank you for the lettuce, and the spinach, and the artichokes, and the asparagus, and the cauliflower, the broccoli, the beans, the tomatoes and the garlic. Thank you for the apricots, and the peaches, and the apples, and the melons, and the plums, the almonds and the grapes.

Thank you for the willow trees, and the roses and the winter lawn. Thank you for scraping, and painting, and roofing and cleaning out the asbestos and the mold. Thank you for your stoicism and your eager hands.

Thank you for all the young men on rooftops in the sun. Thank you for cleaning the toilets and the showers, and the restaurant kitchens, and the schools, and the office buildings, and the airports and the malls. Thank you for washing the car. Thank you for washing all the cars.

Thank you for your parents, who died young and had nothing to bequeath to their children but the memory of work. Thank you for giving us your youth. Thank you for the commemorative altars. Thank you for the food, the beer the tragic polka.

Gracias.

BLOCK: Richard Rodriguez is an editor for New California Media, the consortium of ethnic news organizations. He's also the author of the book BROWN: THE LAST DISCOVERY OF AMERICA.

We're going to hear a variety of voices on immigration in the coming days.

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