Alice Cooper Finds Andy Warhol Art After 40 Years In Storage In the 1970s, Alice Cooper received a silkscreen by his friend Andy Warhol. Then he forgot about it. He and his manager dug it out of storage, and now it may be worth millions.
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Alice Cooper Finds Andy Warhol Art After 40 Years In Storage

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Alice Cooper Finds Andy Warhol Art After 40 Years In Storage

Alice Cooper Finds Andy Warhol Art After 40 Years In Storage

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

I'm Steve Inskeep. And this is Alice Cooper.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WELCOME TO MY NIGHTMARE")

ALICE COOPER: (Singing) Welcome to my nightmare. I think you're gonna like it.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In the 1970s, Alice Cooper lived a stereotypical rockstar life, alcohol, drugs, hanging out with other celebrities. One of his friends at the time was Andy Warhol. And Cooper's girlfriend gave him a Warhol screen print as a gift.

INSKEEP: This is a famous print. It shows an execution chamber with an electric chair in the middle of the room, which was fitting because Alice Cooper had used an electric chair as a prop in a stage show. After the tour, the print and the prop both went into storage.

MARTIN: And that's where they stayed for about 40 years. Then a couple years ago, Alice Cooper's manager remembered that this Warhol print existed. He mentioned it to Cooper, who then dug it up and had it authenticated.

INSKEEP: It was found to be real and, if it's in good shape, could be worth up to $10 million.

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