The Case Of The Returning Ring A woman lost her high school ring once in 1979, before her father found it in a pawn shop. Then she lost it again, but was reunited after someone found it and posted a picture on Facebook.
NPR logo

The Case Of The Returning Ring

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542357368/542357369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Case Of The Returning Ring

The Case Of The Returning Ring

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542357368/542357369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A Florida woman named Shannon Rose Forester says her high school ring keeps coming back to her. She lost it after a car accident in 1979. Eventually, her dad found in a pawn shop. Then, she lost it again while stationed at a naval base in Wisconsin. Somehow, another Florida woman found the ring, posted about it on Facebook, and Forester got it back again.

I'm sure it's sentimental, but she might need to put that thing in the Fires of Mordor if she wants to get rid of it next time. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.