Letters: Response to 'Diary of a Tired Black Man' Liane Hansen reads listeners' comments on Allison Keyes' report last week about the upcoming film "Diary of a Tired Black Man."
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Letters: Response to 'Diary of a Tired Black Man'

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Letters: Response to 'Diary of a Tired Black Man'

Letters: Response to 'Diary of a Tired Black Man'

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

To your letters now, and we received many in response to Allison Keyes' report last week on the upcoming film called Diary of a Tired Black Man. The director, Tim Alexander, focuses on what he calls the angry black woman syndrome. A clip from the film depicting four black women berating a black man for arriving with a white woman in his car prompted passionate debate about interracial dating and the difficulty of black relationships. Taneesha Ford(ph) of Willingboro, New Jersey writes, I have been for the last few years shunning dating white men, seeking a black man who is both articulate and intelligent, who was substantive and cultured, who is strong enough to care for me as I am strong enough to care for him, and have been woefully disappointed in my findings because they want white woman. You want to talk about a strong black community, we sisters are still looking for you, we are still desiring you, but it is not going to be a simple matter of us setting aside all the great flavors that comprise our spirit and soul so that you can feel like a big man. This simply isn't an option. We are too strong, too smart, too intelligent, too capable and care about you too much.

Sandra Malone(ph) of Los Angeles thinks the topic should not have been covered at all. The Web is full of content with dubious worth and/or veracity, but the producers hope to create a buzz by having other media pick it up, she writes. Why NPR, which usually takes the high road in its selection of topics, would contribute to buzz about this slander of black women is beyond me. Who vetted this segment? What other racial or ethnic group would you subject to this kind of treatment?

Lance Ferraro(ph) of Los Angeles thinks the issue isn't solely the property of one ethnic group. This phenomena doesn't just apply to black women, he writes. I am a white man in my mid-50s who hasn't dated for years because I'm tired of angry woman. Many woman have been in past relationships, marriages where they weren't treated well, and as a consequence don't know how to respond to men who do treat them with respect and consideration.

Alyssa Brown(ph) and Cheryl Jones(ph) of Cheverly, Maryland watched the clip of the movie on our Web site and were not impressed. Even after viewing only a snippet, we could see that this was poorly done, poorly written and inauthentic. First and foremast casting a West African man as the lead renders the whole theme culturally off, it doesn't ring true. The interrelationship is not the same. Furthermore, educated black women don't talk like that. The dialogue was contrived and sermonic. If you want us to take this film seriously, give us better content.

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