Cancer Victim Embraced Life and Family Last month, Marcia Glover-Banks, a single mother of three, was battling for time against terminal cancer. During her illness, Glover-Banks wrote and recorded a song with her three young daughters and even wrote a book, Embracing The Journey. She died on June 9 at age 42. Ed Gordon reads a tribute.
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Cancer Victim Embraced Life and Family

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Cancer Victim Embraced Life and Family

Cancer Victim Embraced Life and Family

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ED GORDON, host:

"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." That's a quote from Abraham Lincoln, and those words aptly describe the indomitable spirit of a single mother named Marcia Glover-Banks. Last month, we brought you the story of Marcia's courageous against terminal cancer. That story moved many of you to write us.

Today, we're sorry to report that Marcia was laid to rest last week in Camden, New Jersey. But Marcia held on much longer than doctors expected, more than two years longer, in fact. She was an extremely spiritual woman even before she was diagnosed. When I spoke with her one day at her home in New Jersey, she spent much of the time emphasizing the role faith had played in sustaining her.

Ms. MARCIA GLOVER-BANKS: You have to have your faith now, because when something happens you don't have time to find your faith; either you have it or you don't. And that level of faith is what's going to bring you through.

GORDON: In the time during her illness, you might say Marcia lived life to its fullest. With the help of a local hospice organization, she wrote and recorded a song with her three young daughters. Marcia even wrote a book, Embracing the Journey. It's a memoir of her life of faith during her struggle with the disease.

Ms. GLOVER-BANKS: It's amazing to me. What you would think would be the most vulnerable or most horrific time of my life, I'm at most productive part of my life.

GORDON: But one of the most extraordinary things that I found out about Marcia was that she seemed to have no fear of death.

Ms. GLOVER-BANKS: To be absent from the body is to be present with the Lord.

GORDON: Marcia Glover-Banks is survived by her three daughters, Jasmine, 7, Shanice, 8, and Andrea, 14. Andrea graduated from middle school just last Wednesday. Marcia's book was published last week. All proceeds from the book will go to her children, who now live with their father in Vineland, New Jersey. To find out more, go to our Web site at NPR.org.

(Soundbite of music)

Ms. GLOVER-BANKS: It doesn't matter how long you live. What have you done to edify and build up God's kingdom while you're here?

GORDON: A woman with an extraordinary zest for life, Marcia Glover-Banks was 42 years old.

(Soundbite of music)

Unidentified Woman: (Singing) I wish I knew how it feel be to be free. I wish I could break all the chains holding me. I wish I could say all the things that I could say, say them loud, say them clear, for the whole round world to hear. I wish I could share all the love that's in my heart...

GORDON: That's our program for today. Thanks for joining us. To listen to the show, visit NPR.org. And if you'd like to give us a comment, call 202-408-3330.

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