Mexican Parties Claim Win, Charge Fraud Mexico's top two presidential candidates are each claiming victory in the country's highly polarized election -- and their parties have accused one another of election fraud. An official tally of the contest, in which 30 million Mexicans voted, isn't expected for days. Though sharply divided by ideology, leftist Andres Manual Lopez Obrador and conservative Felipe Calderon are separated by less than one-tenth of one percent.
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Mexican Parties Claim Win, Charge Fraud

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Mexican Parties Claim Win, Charge Fraud

Mexican Parties Claim Win, Charge Fraud

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

The presidential race in Mexico still is undecided. Mexico's Election Institute says Sunday's results are too close to call. Both candidates are declaring victory, but Felipe Calderon seems to have a slight lead over his opponent.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Mexico City.

Calderon appeared on the main morning talk show here and again said he has won Sunday's election.

Mr. FELIPE CALDERON (Presidential Candidate, Mexico): (Through translator) This is a triumph for the voters. We won, by a narrow margin, but we won the presidency of the Republic.

on the same show. He seemed subdued, but said he is willing to fight to the last vote.

Mr. ANDRES MANUEL LOPEZ OBRADOR (Presidential Candidate, Mexico): (Through translator) This is good for everyone. It's healthy. But let's wait. And I insist. We have to see what the final results are.

call the election until mid-week. For now, 370,000 votes divide Calderon and Obrador, but those results are preliminary. This is the narrowest race in Mexican history and on the streets of the capitol there was worry.

Near a duck pond in a Mexico City park, 77-year-old Eduardo Ramos (ph) says he voted for Lopez Obrador. He thinks it will be a fight to the bitter end, though he's not optimistic.

Mr. EDUARDO RAMOS (Resident, Mexico City): (Through translator) I think he won't win, and I knew from the beginning that there were a great many interests here that were trying to block him from becoming president. I think there will be violence. Lopez Obrador won't take this lying down.

beat in this election. Early in the race, polls had consistently shown him way ahead. The former mayor of Mexico City's platform, that the poor must come first, appealed to the 50 percent of Mexicans who live on less than $5.00 a day.

But through his savvy use of the media, conservative Felipe Calderon came up from behind to chip away at Lopez Obrador's lead. Attack ads called the leftist a danger to Mexico and that resonated with some here. Whoever wins, they will have far less than a mandate and Mexico will need to heal the divisions in order to move forward.

Also in the park is Ignacio Costa(ph). He says the one good thing is that this tight election will now show that people's votes really count here.

Mr. IGNACIO COSTA (Resident, Mexico City): (Through translator) We the people have woken up. I think instead of dividing them, this election will bring them together. We now know that we are the bosses of the politicians and not the other way around. We pay them and we choose them.

people.

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