Stress Relief Comes Cheap, but not Sleep China has a bar that invites patrons to break glasses and attack the staff. Customers work off frustration by assaulting staff for a little more than $6. After a hard day's violence, you can spend over a million dollars to sleep on a floating bed. It floats above the ground with magnets that repel each other. Its Dutch designer admits only one problem -- the bed is, quote, "not comfortable at the moment."
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Stress Relief Comes Cheap, but not Sleep

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Stress Relief Comes Cheap, but not Sleep

Stress Relief Comes Cheap, but not Sleep

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with the fruits of global free enterprise.

China has a bar that invites patrons to break glasses and attack the staff. Customers work off frustration by assaulting staff for a little more than six dollars. After a hard day's violence, you can spend over a million dollars to sleep on a floating bed. It floats above the ground with magnets that repel each other. Its Dutch designer admits only one problem — the bed is, quote, not comfortable at the moment.

This is MORNING EDITION.

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