Letters Witch In this word game, contestants must identify a common two-word phrase, then move the first letter of the second word to the end of the first word to form a completely new phrase.
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Letters Witch

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Letters Witch

Letters Witch

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Want our next special guest to play for you? Follow ASK ME ANOTHER on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Our next two contestants will play a game that fell off the Weekend Edition Sunday truck this morning. Let's meet them. First up, Kathryn Miller on buzzer number one.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You're a contract attorney and have a fascination with crimes and criminal law. Welcome.

KATHRYN MILLER: Thank you.

EISENBERG: Kathryn, let's first talk about your - you say a weird fascination with crime and criminal law?

MILLER: I mean, it's semihealthy.

EISENBERG: OK.

MILLER: I'm just obsessed with, you know, mass murders and crime shows. But I don't do anything. I just read about it.

EISENBERG: OK.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Do you think you could commit a crime?

MILLER: No.

EISENBERG: OK. Do you think you could get into the mind of a criminal?

MILLER: Yes.

EISENBERG: OK. And is that fun?

MILLER: It can be.

EISENBERG: It can be?

MILLER: Yeah. I try to think of - I guess how I would do it and how I'd get away and see how I think the show is going to end.

EISENBERG: (Laughter) Yeah. I like it. It's very smart.

MILLER: Thank you.

EISENBERG: Your opponent is Leah Berkowitz on buzzer number two.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You are a rabbi in Poughkeepsie. Welcome.

LEAH BERKOWITZ: Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Leah, what is the weirdest thing as a rabbi you've been asked to do in your community?

BERKOWITZ: I was once asked to bless the opening of a Golden Corral buffet restaurant.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I don't remember the last time I had a fine meal at the Golden Corral, but...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...I'm going to say not very kosher.

BERKOWITZ: No, it is not.

(APPLAUSE)

BERKOWITZ: I actually wasn't available that evening, so I wasn't able to do the blessing. And the restaurant closed after six weeks.

(LAUGHTER)

JONATHAN COULTON: That's what happens.

EISENBERG: Yep. Sad. That's a sad story all around.

BERKOWITZ: Yeah.

EISENBERG: I feel like there was a lot of people that could have gotten together and saved a Golden Corral.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Remember, Kathryn and Leah, win two games, and you get to our final round. So let's go to your first game. We've got a word game for you called Letters Witch. In this game, we took common phrases that are two words long and shifted one of the letters to make a different, funnier, two-word phrase. Puzzle guru Art Chung, will you please give us an example?

ART CHUNG: I sure will. So if I said, start with the most watched U.S. sports event of the year and with a fantastic bird of prey. You'd answer Super Bowl and superb owl. So the hint is the letter that shifts will always be the first letter of the second word in the phrase.

EISENBERG: We'll do it together.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Yeah, we're all here.

COULTON: It's going to be great. It's going to be great.

EISENBERG: Here we go. Start by reformatting your essay to make it twice as long. End with the speed of a tennis match where players are in teams of two.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Leah.

BERKOWITZ: Double space and doubles pace?

EISENBERG: That's right.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That is well done.

COULTON: Start with a platter for carrying chai or Earl Grey. End with a laser that shoots from a cow's utter.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Leah.

BERKOWITZ: Tea tray and teat ray?

COULTON: That is correct.

MILLER: Nice.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Don't drink that milk.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Start with an actor who played George McFly in "Back To The Future." End with someone who enjoys thoroughly cooked bacon.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Leah.

BERKOWITZ: Crispin Glover and crisping lover?

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(CHEERING)

COULTON: Oh, yeah.

EISENBERG: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

MILLER: I was like Michael J. Fox-y? Something? Totally wrong.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I like that you were laughing at the thought of this answer in your brain, Leah.

BERKOWITZ: Yeah. The bacon thing, you know, that's not...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Yeah. For a rabbi, that's a big moment.

BERKOWITZ: Yeah. Yeah.

EISENBERG: Bacon has to - we covet.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Start with a raw cabbage salad side dish. End with a rule made by fashion designer Kenneth.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Leah.

BERKOWITZ: Coleslaw and Cole's law?

COULTON: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right. This is your last clue. Start with what you need in your hand when you slalom down the slopes. End with what happens when you don't cheer for a matador.

MILLER: You got this.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Leah.

BERKOWITZ: Ski poles and skip oles.

EISENBERG: Yeah. That's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Puzzle guru Art Chung, how did our contestants do?

CHUNG: Leah, it's like you were born to play that game.

(CHEERING)

CHUNG: Well done. You're one step closer to our final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: If you've ever stayed up late, looking up at the stars and thought about how small we are compared to the infinite vastness of the universe, you should be a contestant on our show. Just go to amatickets.org. Coming up, Jonathan Coulton will parody our favorite grunge band's hit about deodorant. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

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