Japan Waits on Royal Birth Japan's imperial family has not given birth to a boy since 1965. There's such a shortage of men, that Japan's parliament was planning to alter the law, and let women to inherit the throne. Then Japan's princess Kiko made plans to go to the hospital. The emperor's daughter-in-law is having a baby at age thirty-nine. Japanese media say her Caesarean section is expected next month. Japanese officials halted plans to revise the law, until they learn the gender of the child.
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Japan Waits on Royal Birth

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Japan Waits on Royal Birth

Japan Waits on Royal Birth

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Japan's imperial family has not given birth to a boy since 1965. There's such a shortage of men that Japan's parliament was planning to alter the law and let women to inherit the throne. Then Japan's princess Kiko made plans to go to the hospital. The emperor's daughter-in-law is having a baby at age thirty-nine. Japanese media say her caesarean section is expected next month. And Japanese officials halted plans to revise the law until they learn the gender of the child. It's MORNING EDITION.

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