Letters: A Visit from Tom Hanks We read a letter from listener Mark Ptak about last week's puzzle segment with celebrity guest Tom Hanks.
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Letters: A Visit from Tom Hanks

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Letters: A Visit from Tom Hanks

Letters: A Visit from Tom Hanks

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

A number of you were pleased enough to write to us about last week's puzzle segment with surprise guest Tom Hanks and contestant Mary Modica from South Dakota. If you missed the on-air challenge, they were trying to come up with two-word phrases. The first began with P and the second with R-O. Here's a little clip.

(Soundbite of WEEKEND EDITION SUNDAY)

Mr. WILL SHORTZ (Puzzlemaster): A big piece of beef cooked in one piece and served in its juice.

Ms. MARY MODICA (Caller): Pot roast.

Mr. SHORTZ: Excellent. The top of a...

Mr. TOM HANKS (Actor): I was gonna say prime rib, but...

HANSEN: Oh.

Mr. HANKS: You need some good South Dakota roots to get that pot roast.

Ms. MODICA: Yeah, some of us don't have prime rib.

HANSEN: That segment prompted a thoughtful note from Mark Ptak of Stevens Point, Wisconsin. He writes, The prime rib comment from South Dakota aside, I had a grin from ear to ear this morning as I came into the office on a Sunday. Mr. Hanks' easy manner reminded me of one important lesson I learned years ago as a Peace Corps volunteer in Kenya. Listeners to NPR have more commonality in their desire for intelligent humor and true information than the type of car they drive, pickup or Rolls. As my volunteer friends so many years ago missed ATC and Morning Edition as much as ice cream and warm showers, I was puzzled. I am puzzled no more and somehow I think that no matter where Mr. Hanks is on a Sunday morning, he probably has a feed into his dressing room of Liane and Will, just like the smart Dakota wheat farmer on the combine. They both do important work and their commonalities are far more than their differences, no matter what cut of meat they have for dinner.

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