Trapped In Barbed Wire, White Owl Now Flies Free The bird was trapped in barbed wire near the Smithfield prison in Huntingdon, Pa. A state game commission officer used a crate and a net to coax the owl to safety.
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Trapped In Barbed Wire, White Owl Now Flies Free

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Trapped In Barbed Wire, White Owl Now Flies Free

Trapped In Barbed Wire, White Owl Now Flies Free

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/574932173/574932174" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Rachel Martin. And on this day, a rare and beautiful white owl is flying free. The bird was trapped in a bunch of barbed wire near the Smithfield prison in Huntington, Penn. A state game commission officer used a crate and net to coax the owl to safety. He came out with some minor skin tears but is expected to make a full recovery. And yes, while we celebrate that fact, it is all really an excuse to play this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FREE BIRD")

LYNYRD SKYNYRD: (Singing) I'm a free bird, yeah.

MARTIN: It's MORNING EDITION.

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