Our Spring New Music Extravaganza — And An Important Question : Alt.Latino Tons of great music came in during the winter months and time to share the wealth.

Our Spring New Music Extravaganza — And An Important Question

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(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TANGA BUENA")

TANGA: (Singing) Tanga sabrosito en la calle. Tanga, ya tan bueno tú sabes.

FELIX CONTRERAS, HOST:

From NPR Music, this is ALT.LATINO. I'm Felix Contreras. It's springtime - time for rebirth. Time to bring the cattle in from the mountains and shear the wool or whatever it is that they do. And it's also time to explore some new music. And I have a bunch, so we're going to have very little yapping from me. And as we used to say, less talk and more rock. And we're starting with a band called Tanga. This track is called "Tanga Buena." The album is "Reencarnación." Great record. Check it out.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TANGA BUENA")

TANGA: (Rapping) I know they should. Yo, come on. Check it. Respect it. I'm grinding by the second. If y'all gon' understand, we pulled that new Tanga record. Yeah. And yeah, you rockin' with the finest. I'm not the illest rapper, and I'm not from the projects. (Inaudible) The city's where I'm from. On the streets, we go hard. In the club, we go dumb. When I got a drink in my hand, you got to understand that I can keep on flowing. I'm flying high like Peter Pan. You got to understand that I'ma do this till I die. Señoritas drop it low 'cause they know I'm aiming high. Yeah. Blazing up (inaudible). It's on fire. Dime, mami, tell me what you desire because I came to play. I got the COD. Yo, I got that Call Of Duty. That always be doing me. I'm down with (inaudible) Yeah, you know me. Yo, escuche mi tumbao que dice así. Come on.

(Singing) Tanga, sabrosito en la calle. Tanga ya tan bueno tú sabes. Tanga, sabrosito en la calle. Tanga ya tan bueno tú sabes.

(Rapping) It's time. It's time. Let me see you wind. Let me see you turn. Let me see you grind. Move to my flow. Yeah, move to my beat. Who's that? Who's that? Tanga ladies. (Inaudible)

(Singing, inaudible)

CONTRERAS: OK. Next up, an album called "Havana Meets Kingston."

(SOUNDBITE OF BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB SONG, "CHAN CHAN")

CONTRERAS: I think you get the idea. You recognize this? This is the classic from Buena Vista Social Club with a little bit of a spin to it. "Chan Chan" from the album Havana Meets Kingston.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CHAN CHAN")

BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB: (Singing) De Alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De Alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De Alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí El cariño que te tengo No te lo puedo negar Se me sale la babita Yo no lo puedo evitar Cuando Juanica y Chan Chan En el mar cernían arena Como sacudía el jibe A Chan Chan le daba pena Cuando Juanica y Chan Chan En el mar cernían arena Como sacudía el jibe A Chan Chan le daba pena Limpia el camino de pajas Que yo me quiero sentar En aquel tronco que veo Y así no puedo llegar Limpia el camino de pajas Que yo me quiero sentar En aquel tronco que veo Y así no puedo llegar De alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí De alto Cedro voy para Marcané Llego a Cueto, voy para Mayarí.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "INVISIBLE")

ALICE BAG: (Singing) Just one more, he said an hour ago. Then he stumbled around before finally hitting the ground.

CONTRERAS: You are listening to ALT.LATINO. This is our 2018 spring new music extravaganza. Now we're going to change gears completely from Havana Meets Kingston to punk - Southern California punk. This is a new album by Alice Bag. She was a leading figure in punk and Chicano punk in the '70s, and she's still active, incredibly creative. She has a new album out called "Blueprint." This is called "Invisible." Again - Alice Bag.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "INVISIBLE")

BAG: (Singing) Invisible, invisible. He wants to be invisible, invisible. Strangers pick him up, shake their heads and send him off. He's got drinking friends where his thinking friends had been. He's courting oblivion with a lover's zeal. He wants to fall deeper till he disappears. He wants to be invisible, invisible. He wants to be invisible, invisible. And in his sober moments, there is a girl. There is a girl. She's the silver lining in his stormy world, his stormy world. But he can't hold on long enough to love her like he knows he should. She wishes he would. He can't hold on long enough to love her like he knows he should. She wishes he could. But he's courting oblivion with a lover's zeal. He wants to fall deeper till he disappears. He wants to be invisible, invisible. He wants to be invisible, invisible. He wants to be invisible, invisible.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MURO")

MEXICAN STANDOFF: Esta canción es dedicada a toda la gente que vive en el otro lado del muro, a la que vive en este lado del muro. Y a todos los que quieren construir el muro, que se lo metan por el culo.

CONTRERAS: OK, now some music from Mexican Standoff, which is a collective of musicians from the Southern California Latin music scene. They get together every now and then to make music and to make statements. And this is called "Muro," or the wall. You know what they're talking about.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MURO")

MEXICAN STANDOFF: (Singing) Mi mami trabajaba duro to feed me and my hermanitos. Didn't speak any English - it was hard to make amigos. I was good at school. I never missed a day, played a lot of sports, got a lot of A's. Wanted to be a doctor someday - they say I can't 'cause I'm illegal.

Muro. Muro. I was born south of the muro. Muro. I grew up north of the muro.

Obama el ex-presidente deportó a muchos amigos. But right before he left us, he passed a bill to save us. But now the presidente, whose name we don't want to mention, wants to take away our hard work and dedication. I get up at six, I head off to school and then go to work and do it again. Wanted to be a doctor someday - they say I can't 'cause I'm a dreamer.

Muro. Muro. I was born south of the muro. Muro. I grew up north of the muro. Muro. I was born south of the muro. Muro. Muro. I grew up north of the Muro. Oh.

I get up at six, I head off to school and then go to work and do it again. Wanted to be a doctor someday - they say I can't 'cause I'm a dreamer.

Muro. I was born south of the muro. Muro. Muro. I grew up north of the muro. Muro. Muro. I was born south of the muro. Muro. I grew up north of the muro. Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M LATE")

KERA: (Singing) Darlin' don't go. It's literally been ages now. So close and yet so far somehow.

CONTRERAS: OK, now a track I have not been able to stop listening to - this is KERA, and formerly Kera And The Lesbians. The album's called "Fall." This track is called "I'm Late." Haunting voice, great arrangement - you'll see what I'm talking about.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M LATE")

KERA: (Singing) Only place in the world I'd be. Ooh.

Can't seem to know how to fake it. Lord knows I try. Can't seem to know how to take it. It's always on my mind.

One thing I know - it's literally been ages now. So close and yet so far somehow. One thing I know - you and me and the world make three. Only thing in the world I need is you. Darlin' we know. It's best the time to learn to take it slow. The finer things in life remain unknown.

Oh. Oh. Ay. Ay. Oh. Oh.

CONTRERAS: OK. Next up is a track called "El Hijo De La Cumbia." There's absolutely no secret about what this song is about. It's from an artist named Che Revolution, and it features the Cuban vocalist La Dame Blanche - a great collaboration of two very, very powerful performers. Check it out.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CHE REVOLUTION")

LA DAME BLANCHE: (Singing) Ya no me queda. Me lo probé, pero no me queda. Ya ni me duerme, ni me desvela. Qué pena. Me lo probé, pero no me queda. Pero no me queda, eh. Pero no me queda. Ya ni me duerme, ni me desvela. Qué pena. Me lo probé, pero no me queda, pero no me queda, eh. Antes llegaba apurada, ahora me apuro por salir por nada. Antes, antes me impresionaba, ahora no me impresiona para nada. Te acomodaste en la sala, y cómodo me fui por la ventana. Ay, qué miedo, qué duro. Voy a salir con el disimulo. ¿Dónde está el problema? Yo concluyo. Me apunto para toda gozadera en conjunto. Me apunto en to'. Quiero sacarme un susto. ¿Para qué, qué, qué? Me pregunto. Lo que no sirve se bota o coge gusto. Si se te pone a reja, la segunda no falla. Dicen por ahí que la, dicen por aquí que la segunda no falla. Dicen por aquí que las segundas son malas, malas, mal, mal, mal, mal, mal, mal, mala, mal, mal, mal, mal, mala. Ya no me queda. Me lo probé, pero no me queda. Ya ni me duerme, ni me desvela. Qué pena. Me lo probé, pero no me queda. Pero no me queda, eh. Pero no me queda. Antes me sacrificaba. Ahora el sacrificio no me dice nada. Antes cuando me miraba, cuando me besaba, cuando me tocaba, me hablaba. Antes cuando nos veíamos, nos escribíamos, nos escondíamos, hacíamos. Antes cómo me gustaba, y ahora ese antes no me dice nada. Ya no me queda.

CONTRERAS: Next up on the ALT.LATINO Spring New Music Extravaganza, we slow it down. This is a track called "You Are My Sunshine." The album is called "Tú Eres Mi Flor." It's from Elizabeth Mitchell and the iconic Argentine folk singer Suni Paz. It's on Smithsonian Folkways Records (ph). And it says it's a children's album, but aren't we all children at heart?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GRACIAS MIL (THANKS A LOT)")

ELIZABETH MITCHELL: (Singing) Gracias mil por el sol en lo alto del cielo.

SUNI PAZ: (Singing) Gracias mil por las altas nubes en su vuelo.

MITCHELL: (Singing) Gracias mil por el viento en su carrera.

PAZ: (Singing) Gracias mil por el ave en primavera.

MITCHELL: (Singing) Gracias mil por noches de luna tan bellas.

PAZ: (Singing) Gracias mil por el brillar de las estrellas.

MITCHELL: (Singing) Gracias mil por lo mejor que hay en mí.

PAZ: (Singing) Gracias mil por mi profundo sentir. Gracias por los animales.

MITCHELL: (Singing) Todos los campos.

PAZ: (Singing) La gente de la tierra en la que creo.

ELIZABETH MITCHELL AND SUNI PAZ: (Singing) Gracias mil por todo aquello que poseo. Gracias por aquello que poseo.

CONTRERAS: And now some music from Lindi Ortega. She's a vocalist from Canada. She's transplanted to Nashville, and she's got a great concept album out called "Liberty" - definitely worth the hunt. And she's got a great concept album out called "Liberty." Amazing voice, great songs. Please don't miss this one. Again, Lindi Ortega.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FOREVER BLUE")

LINDI ORTEGA: (Singing) I have been warned by the wind, and I shall not go, clouds on the horizon where the wind blows. I see the sun in the west light up the sky. That is where me and my horse will ride - far away from the storm, lighting and rain. Though the thunder may roar, soon it will fade. We'll find a clear where only light will shine. That is where me and my horse will ride. Oh, light, glorious light, I will follow you. Skies will always be forever blue. I've spent most of my days fighting the dark. Now that I've turned away, the clouds they have part. I know the sun is always bound to rise. We'll be fine, my horse and I. Oh, light, glorious light, I will follow you. Skies will always be forever blue. Oh, skies will always be forever blue.

CONTRERAS: And now we're going to finish our 2018 Spring New Music Extravaganza with a great new album by the Texmaniacs. That's Max Baca and the boys from Texas keeping conjunto alive and moving it forward at the same time. Here it's a collaboration with Lyle Lovett on Woody Guthrie's iconic song, "Deportee." The album's called "Cruzando Borders," and it's also on Smithsonian Folkways Records (ph). Los Texmaniacs keeping it real.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DEPORTEE")

LYLE LOVETT: (Singing) The crops are all in, and peaches are rotting. The oranges are piled in their creosote dumps. They're flying you back to the Mexico border to pay all your money to wade back again. My father's own father - he waded that river. They took all the money he made in his life. My brothers and sisters come working the fruit trees. They rode the trucks till they lay down and died. Goodbye to my Juan. Goodbye, Rosalita. Adios, mis amigos, Jesus y Maria. You won't have a name when you ride the big airplane. All they will call you will be deportee. Some of us are illegal and others not wanted. Our work contract's out, and we have to move on. Six hundred miles to the Mexico border. They chase us like outlaws, like rustlers, like thieves. We died in your hills. We died in your deserts. We died in your valleys. We died on your plains. We died in your trees, and we died in your bushes. Both sides of the river, we died just the same. Goodbye to my Juan. Goodbye, Rosalita. Adios, mis amigos, Jesus y Maria. You won't have a name when you ride the big airplane. All they will call you will be deportees. The sky plane caught fire over Los Gatos Canyon, a fireball of lightning that shook all our hills. Who are these friends, all scattered like dry leaves? The radio says they are just deportees. Is this the best way we can grow our big orchards? Is this the best we can grow our good fruit? - to fall like dry leaves and rot on our topsoil.

CONTRERAS: I hate to talk over the music. But I want to remind you, you can hear all this music and more on our website at npr.org/alt.latino. Don't forget to look for us on Facebook and Twitter. We are NPR's ALT.LATINO. And we were just named on Time magazine's list of 50 essential podcasts - very proud to be included and happy to share this music with you, again.

I'm Felix Contreras. This has been ALT.LATINO. Thank you for listening.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DEPORTEE")

LOVETT: (Singing) All they will call you will be deportee.

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