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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everyone they can join us most weeks right here at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Ill. For tickets and more information, just roll on over to wbez.org, or you can find a link at our website, which is waitwait.npr.org.

But right now, panel, as is traditional, we're going to ask you some questions about this week's news. Negin, the New York Times reported that despite strides made by companies in hiring women, women are still outnumbered in executive-level offices by whom?

NEGIN FARSAD: By men?

SAGAL: By men...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...But not just by men - by a specific kind of man.

FARSAD: White men?

SAGAL: Well, yes.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I'm going to give it to you.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: They pointed out that in America's corporate suites, there are fewer women than there are men named John.

FARSAD: Oh, that's right.

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

FARSAD: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

SAGAL: There are more CEOs named John than there are CEOs who are women. If that seems like bad news, don't worry. There are also more male CEOs named James. That's right. Some men are finally breaking the Jimmy ceiling.

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

SAGAL: There are also more Republican senators who are Johns, and we mean that both literally and prostitutionally.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: The problem is clear. Affluent white parents need to come up with better names for your male children, OK? No more Johns.

BRIAN BABYLON: Like LaDanian (ph).

SAGAL: Something.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: Or just like - the better solution is all female babies from here on out should be named John.

POUNDSTONE: Named John. Absolutely.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Maybe that's it. Maybe they're not looking for men - they're just looking for people named John.

FARSAD: Yeah, that's been the problem. I didn't know.

SAGAL: Who knew?

FARSAD: We don't need feminism, you guys.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: We just need to change our name to John.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOC AND MERLE WATSON SONG, "JOHN HENRY/WORRIED BLUES")

SAGAL: Coming up, shields up. It's a security-themed Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAITWAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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