The Makers Of 'Sesame Street' Move To Protect The Brand They've sued the people behind the trailer for Melissa McCarthy's film: The Happytime Murders. She's a detective working with a puppet. Can the tagline get away with: No Sesame. All Street?
NPR logo

The Makers Of 'Sesame Street' Move To Protect The Brand

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615079793/615079794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Makers Of 'Sesame Street' Move To Protect The Brand

Law

The Makers Of 'Sesame Street' Move To Protect The Brand

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615079793/615079794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Makers of "Sesame Street" are protecting the brand. They sued the people behind the new Melissa McCarthy film. In "The Happytime Murders," she's a detective working with a puppet. "Sesame Street" producers complained the film features, quote, "explicit, profane, drug-using, misogynistic, violent puppets," but that's not the heart of the lawsuit. You can make a film with puppets. But can you get away with the movie's tag line - no sesame, all street? It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.