'The Road' Travels a Desolate American Future Cormac McCarthy's latest book, The Road, is a story about the journey of a father and son through a post-apocalyptic American landscape. But it may be a comment on conditions today.
NPR logo

'The Road' Travels a Desolate American Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6158326/6158327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'The Road' Travels a Desolate American Future

'The Road' Travels a Desolate American Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6158326/6158327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Here's a review of the new novel out this week from Cormac McCarthy. He's the author who impressed a wide audience and Hollywood filmmakers with past books like All the Pretty Horses.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

The Road is so bleak that it passes as humor when the boy on the lifeless highway asks his father, what are our long-term plans? You begin to wonder if the novelist Cormac McCarthy is posing that question to us?

MONTAGNE: The novel by Cormac McCarthy is called The Road.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.