Sunday Puzzle: Just So Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the initials S-O.
NPR logo

Sunday Puzzle: Just So

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/622526260/622959138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sunday Puzzle: Just So

Sunday Puzzle: Just So

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/622526260/622959138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

SUSAN DAVIS, HOST:

I'm Susan Davis. And this week, I'm in the puzzle seat since Lulu is reporting in Mexico City. And now those two words I've always wanted to say - let's play.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVIS: Joining me is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Sue. Welcome to the program.

DAVIS: Thank you very much. First, remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from Mike Reiss, who's a writer for "The Simpsons." I said think of a familiar hyphenated seven-letter word. The first four letters name a prominent American company. And the last four letters name a different prominent American company. What word is it? Well, the word is vis-a-vis. And those companies are Visa and Avis.

DAVIS: We had roughly 400 responses. And this week's winner is William Pahle from Chicago, Ill. Congratulations, and welcome to the program.

WILLIAM PAHLE: Well, thank you. I'm happy to be here.

DAVIS: William, I hear you're no stranger to this puzzle game.

PAHLE: No. I was on 11 years ago.

DAVIS: Have you been dining out on that puzzle glory ever since?

(LAUGHTER)

PAHLE: No. I've been playing a lot of "Monopoly," though.

(LAUGHTER)

DAVIS: William, are you ready to play The Puzzle again?

PAHLE: I'm as ready as I'll ever be, I guess.

DAVIS: All right, Will. Take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, William and Sue, today's puzzle is called Just So. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the initials S-O. For example, if I said eye, ear or nose, you would say sensory organ.

PAHLE: OK.

SHORTZ: All right. Number one - breakfast dish made with eggs and potatoes, often with some onions and peppers.

PAHLE: Some kind of omelet (laughter).

SHORTZ: Yes. What nationality?

PAHLE: Swiss?

SHORTZ: No, not a Swiss omelet. It's from the Iberian Peninsula.

PAHLE: I don't know. Oh, Spanish omelet, of course.

SHORTZ: Spanish omelet is it. Good.

PAHLE: (Laughter).

SHORTZ: Number two - midway between noon and midnight.

PAHLE: Midway between noon and midnight. Six o'clock.

SHORTZ: Six o'clock is it. Good. Person regarded only in terms of their attractiveness, not as a person. Like a Playboy Playmate, for example.

DAVIS: I think of, like, Marilyn Monroe...

SHORTZ: There you go.

DAVIS: ...As the original.

SHORTZ: Yes.

PAHLE: I don't know.

SHORTZ: Sue, you can jump in on this.

DAVIS: I would say sex object.

SHORTZ: Sex object is it. Good.

PAHLE: Oh, OK (laughter).

SHORTZ: All right. Try this one. "The Young And The Restless" or "The Bold And The Beautiful." And it's a sort of program you might not - you might watch during the daytime.

PAHLE: Oh, a soap opera. Sure.

SHORTZ: Soap opera is it. All right. Try this one. One-time NBA star whose jersey numbers have been retired by both the LA Lakers and Miami Heat.

PAHLE: I have no idea.

(LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: Don't follow basketball. Do you know this, Sue?

DAVIS: I do know this one.

SHORTZ: Go.

DAVIS: Shaquille O'Neal.

SHORTZ: Shaquille...

PAHLE: Oh, OK.

SHORTZ: ...O'Neal is it.

PAHLE: Sure.

SHORTZ: All right. Back to you, William. It begins, on my honor, I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country. And it's something...

PAHLE: Oh, Scout...

SHORTZ: Yeah.

PAHLE: The scout...

SHORTZ: Yeah. Yeah. Scout what? It's where you swear or promise to something.

PAHLE: Scouts' Oath.

SHORTZ: Scout oath is right. Now if you start all over, you go back to this.

PAHLE: The starting...

SHORTZ: No. It's not start. If you start all over, you go back to this, like in a crossword puzzle. Sounds like I stumped you on that. Do you know this one, Sue?

DAVIS: Square one.

SHORTZ: You go back to square one is right. And here's your last one - is end as a radio or television broadcast.

PAHLE: Sign off.

SHORTZ: Sign off...

DAVIS: There you go.

SHORTZ: ...Is correct.

DAVIS: My 85-year-old brain didn't do too well today.

SHORTZ: We thought you did fine.

DAVIS: We thought you did great, William. For playing The Puzzle today, you are going to get the WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as some puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. William, what's your member station?

PAHLE: WBEZ in Chicago.

DAVIS: William Pahle from Chicago, Ill., thank you so much for playing The Puzzle with us.

PAHLE: Oh, thank you for your patience.

DAVIS: OK, Will. Tell us about next week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from Joseph Young of St. Cloud, Minn., who conducts the weekly blog Puzzleria. Think of a well-known commercial name in nine letters. Change both the fourth and ninth letters to X's, and you'll get two other familiar commercial names, one after the other. What names are these? So again, a well-known commercial name in nine letters. Change both the fourth and ninth letters to X's, and you get two other familiar commercial names, one after the other. What names are these?

DAVIS: When you think you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline is Thursday, June 28 at 3 p.m. Eastern. And make sure to include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. If you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Sue.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.