Quite A Concept Contestants guess whether concept album descriptions are really real or really fake.

Quite A Concept

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Attention all dads, take a break from being emotionally unavailable because our next game is about concept albums.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Diana, I hear you have a foam finger collection.

DIANA CORRIGAN: Yeah, I've gotten one from every Major League Baseball stadium that I've gone to.

EISENBERG: OK, so how many in your collection currently?

CORRIGAN: Fifteen.

EISENBERG: That's pretty good.

CORRIGAN: Thank you.

EISENBERG: What is the variation in the foam finger...

CORRIGAN: Sometimes, they put the mascot on, although the coolest one is from Wrigley Field. Instead of like a foam finger that looks like the weird number one...

EISENBERG: Yeah.

CORRIGAN: ...It's a bear claw.

EISENBERG: Nice.

CORRIGAN: So it's fun to chase my kids with.

EISENBERG: Oh, yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Yeah. So, Marc, you also play saxophone.

MARC KADUSHIN: Yes.

EISENBERG: And your friends once dared you to play "Careless Whisper," the classic saxophone solo, while wandering around campus.

KADUSHIN: So it was Halloween. It was right when that sexy sax man video was very popular. And it was last minute. We were - they were going out, and I needed a costume. So I have a saxophone. I can do that. Memorized the lick. And we're going out - and fast forward. It's three hours later. And I haven't actually stopped playing because, at this point, my lower teeth are so deep into my lips and the reed that it would hurt more to extricate them than to stop.

(LAUGHTER)

KADUSHIN: So that was a fun night.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: There is something so beautiful about the way you told that story. So this is a guessing game called Quite A Concept. A concept album, of course, is a collection of songs that are unified by some sort of theme or overarching story. I'll describe an album, you tell me if it's real or something we made up. But be careful because if you guess incorrectly, your opponent automatically scores the point. Diana, you won the last game, so you win this and you go to the final round. Marc, you need to win this or we're going to give you a gift certificate to Sam Goody.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Here we go. This modern classic by Janelle Monae tells a story of a heroic android who travels back in time to save a city from an evil society that has harnessed the power of time travel to oppress its citizens.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Is that real or fake? Diana.

CORRIGAN: Real.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's real, for sure, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Let's hear a little bit of "The ArchAndroid."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DANCE OR DIE")

JANELLE MONAE: (Singing) Zombie, zombie, zombie, where do dreams come from? A little bird is chirping, and she's singing a song. She's shaking them and waking them and giving them mas. As the clock tick tocks and the bodies drop...

EISENBERG: It feels like just running to find a charger.

JULIAN VELARD, BYLINE: Yeah. Yeah.

EISENBERG: In 1999, the Spice Girls cooked up a concept album where they each took on the persona of a British condiment, including Marmite, salad cream, HP Sauce, malt vinegar and baby spice.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Real or fake?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Marc.

KADUSHIN: I'm going to say fake.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's fake.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Salad cream? Come on. No, that's real.

Kate Bush's 2011 album is all about snow. One song includes 50 words for snow. Another is told from the perspective of a falling snowflake. Real or fake?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Marc.

KADUSHIN: Real?

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's real.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: "50 Words For Snow." Let's listen to a little bit of "50 Words For Snow."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "50 WORDS FOR SNOW")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing) Vanilla swarm, icyskidski.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Allegedly a pirate radio broadcast, this 1960s rock record by The Who features fake public service announcements and commercials for items like baked beans and deodorant. Real or Fake?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Diana.

CORRIGAN: Real.

EISENBERG: It is real, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Let's hear it. This is "Coke After Coke."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "COKE 2")

THE WHO: (Singing) Coke after Coke after Coke after Coca-Cola. Coke after Coke after Coke after Coca-Cola.

EISENBERG: The album's called "The Who Sells Out."

(LAUGHTER)

VELARD: It's good. I like it.

EISENBERG: This is your last clue. A 1975 concept album by Alice Cooper takes listeners on a hard-rock journey through the nightmares of a boy named Steven and includes narration by Vincent Price. Real or fake?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Diana

CORRIGAN: Real.

EISENBERG: Yeah, it's real.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: So many real things. It's called "Welcome To My Nightmare." This is "The Black Widow." Let's listen.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE BLACK WIDOW")

ALICE COOPER: (Singing) The horror that he'll bring, the horror of his sting, the unholiest of kings - the Black Widow.

EISENBERG: Sounds awesome. Yeah. All right. Great game, both of you. Well done. Diana, you won that game as well, so you are moving on to our final round.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

EISENBERG: Coming up, we'll find out who will face off against Diana in our final round. And we'll talk to actor Jessica Walter. She was born in Brooklyn. Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Right above what is now a bespoke vape shop. And fingers crossed - if she's anything like the character she plays on television, she'll be hilariously disappointed in me. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

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