Voices in the News A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including Fox Network's sports announcer; a St. Louis Cardinals fan; Donald Trump; Bill Nevett, NYSE floor trader; a U.S. Census Bureau official; Carl Haub at the Population Reference Bureau; U.S. military spokesman Major General Caldwell; President George W. Bush; Rep. John Murtha (D-PA); Gerald Richman, Mark Foley's civil attorney; House Majority Leader John Boehner; Rich Lowry of the National Review; Tony Fabrizio, Republican pollster.
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen. And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. JOE BUCK (Sportscaster): Molina leaps into the arms of Adam Wainwright, as the rookie closer strikes out Beltran looking with the bases loaded. And the Cardinals celebrate before their trip to Detroit.

Unidentified Woman: I loved it! I - I - it was amazing! And I love Yadier Molina!

(Soundbite of high-pitched scream)

Mr. DONALD TRUMP (Businessman): Well, I'm very happy that we're all a part of this incredible economy. It just keeps going. It's a great boost for the nation itself. You know, we're mired in a war that's a horrible war and it's just a great boost of confidence for the nation.

Mr. BILL NEVETT (NYSE Floor Trader): This is a number that can either go right through and come right back down. It's just a mental image that America has, but I think most people on the floor - 12,000, you know, it's not something you see every day.

U.S. CENSUS BUREAU OFFICIAL: That baby, the 300 millionth, is being born somewhere in America right now.

Mr. CARL HAUB (Population Reference Bureau): It puts us in third place and it's probably a position we'll maintain for a long time to come. But we're pretty far behind the other two: China at 1.3 billion, and India at 1.1. I don't think we'll catch them any time soon.

Major General WILLIAM CALDWELL (U.S. Army): Traditionally, this is a time of great celebration. It has instead been a period of increased violence, not just this year but during the past two years, as well.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: They would have our country quit in Iraq before the job is done. For the sake of the security of the United States of America, we must defeat the enemy in Iraq.

Representative JOHN MURTHA (Democrat, Pennsylvania): The president said there's weapons of mass destruction. The president said we could do it for $50 billion. The president said that we'd be welcomed as liberators. What makes you think because the president said it, that that's the way it's going to be?

Mr. GERALD RICHMAN (Attorney for Mark Foley): The archdiocese has sent a letter through its attorney requesting the name. And so we've been reviewing that letter to determine how best to do it. And after carefully looking at the legal issues, we've decided that this is the appropriate way to handle it.

Representative JOHN BOEHNER (Republican, Majority Leader): It does not appear to be affecting any of our races in any way. I think most Americans care about how much they're paying in taxes, what we've done on border security, and most importantly, what we're doing to make sure that our country is safe from attacks from terrorists.

Mr. RICH LOWRY (National Review): The difference between a bad election night for Republicans and a total wipeout is whether the base shows up or not.

Mr. TONY FABRIZIO (Republican Pollster): The outlook is very, very bleak. To be honest with you, I don't know what can change the environment now. The only things that could change the environment to our advantage are things that I would never want to have happen.

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