Don't Get It Twisted: 'We're Not Gonna Take It' Can Be Anyone's Protest Song Talk about ironic: Twisted Sister's 1984 anthem to bucking authority has since been adopted by religious entities, teachers and even politicians, each bending it to their own definition.
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Don't Get It Twisted: 'We're Not Gonna Take It' Can Be Anyone's Protest Song

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Don't Get It Twisted: 'We're Not Gonna Take It' Can Be Anyone's Protest Song

Don't Get It Twisted: 'We're Not Gonna Take It' Can Be Anyone's Protest Song

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Back in April, teachers in Oklahoma went on strike. And their message was amplified by a song.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Singing) We're not going to take it. No, we ain't going to take it.

MARTIN: Protesting educators found their voice in Twisted Sister's heavy metal hit "We're Not Gonna Take It." That song has been appropriated in wildly different ways over the years, which makes it perfect for NPR's series American Anthem all about songs that have inspired, rallied, even revolutionized.

(SOUNDBITE OF TWISTED SISTER SONG, "WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT")

MARTIN: In 1984, this was the sound of student rebellion.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT")

TWISTED SISTER: (Singing) We're not going to take it. No, we ain't going to take it. We're not going to take it anymore.

DEE SNIDER: I wanted to write an anthem for the audience to raise their fists in the air in righteous anger.

MARTIN: That is the distinctive voice of Twisted Sister's frontman, Dee Snider. He told me the chorus came to him quickly, but it took more than three years to really get the song where he wanted it to be. Rock fans loved it. Critics - not so much. Snider remembers getting one brief but scathing review about the name "We're Not Gonna Take It."

SNIDER: What from whom?

MARTIN: (Laughter).

SNIDER: That was the review - what from whom? Aren't we so ironic and funny and wonderful? But who has had the last laugh? I mean, 35, 40, whatever years later, it's a folk song, for God's sakes. And it's made millions of dollars, so ha ha ha.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT")

TWISTED SISTER: (Singing) Oh, you're so condescending. Your gall is never-ending. We don't want nothing, nothing from you.

MARTIN: Time passed, and the criticisms got more serious. And the critics had more power. The Parents Music Resource Center, or PMRC, was this group established in 1985. Al Gore's then wife Tipper was one of the leaders. And their big issue was they didn't like that kids could be exposed to adult themes or potentially offensive language in music. And they singled out "We're Not Gonna Take It." Washington, D.C., paid attention.

(SOUNDBITE OF GAVEL TAPPING)

MARTIN: On September 19, 1985, Dee Snider was called to testify before the U.S. Senate.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Mr. Snider, thank you for being here.

MARTIN: You'd think maybe even a rock star might wear a suit or at least a button-down shirt. Not Snider. He showed up with a black cutoff T-shirt, ripped up jeans and that explosion of long, blond, curly hair.

SNIDER: I knew I was going to blindside them. There's an old TV show called "Columbo." And it was this bumbling detective who seemed like such a screw-up, but he was actually brilliant. And I said, they're going to look at me, and I'm going to play right into this. I'm going to have my speech that we worked on for two weeks stuffed in the back pocket of my skinny jeans. And I pulled it out like the bad kid in class. You know, you got your homework, Dee? Yeah.

MARTIN: Right. It looks like a dirty Kleenex that you're putting down (laughter).

SNIDER: Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. And then I just laid them out.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

SNIDER: The beauty of literature, poetry and music is that they leave room for the audience to put its own imagination, experiences and dreams into the words. The examples I cited earlier showed clear evidence of Twisted Sister's music being completely misinterpreted and unfairly judged by supposedly well-informed adults. We cannot allow this to continue.

MARTIN: And "We're Not Gonna Take It" was now an anthem about fighting censorship.

SNIDER: It just started transforming.

MARTIN: The beauty of the song is that anyone could project their own story onto it.

SNIDER: The Yankees started using it. It became - started becoming this rock and jock thing.

MARTIN: German soccer fans gave the song new lyrics.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EUROPAPOKALSIEGER FCB (TWISTED SISTER 'WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT')")

BAYERN-FANS UNITED: (Singing in German).

MARTIN: It was even embraced by a Christian rock band called ApologetiX. They reinterpreted the song as "We're Not Going To Canaaan."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE'RE NOT GOING TO CANAAN")

APOLOGETIX: (Singing) Despite the powers of Egypt, God picked us just to reach it.

MARTIN: And in a great ironic twist, just a few decades after the song was pilloried on Capitol Hill, politicians started using the song at campaign events. Dee Snider was OK with Arnold Schwarzenegger using it, not at all happy with Paul Ryan doing so. But it was a far more complicated decision when it came to this guy.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: And we will make America great again. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

MARTIN: Snider had been a contestant on Donald Trump's reality show "Celebrity Apprentice." The two brash New Yorkers struck up a friendship.

SNIDER: I spent time with the Trump family. They were great. We did charity events together. And Donald asked if he could use the song. And I said sure. He's a friend. I thought we were on the same page. Three months later, I'm tapping out. He is now talking about things we never spoke about at dinner, and...

MARTIN: Like - what? - just his politics that you didn't know?

SNIDER: His politics, yeah. And to his credit, I called and I said, I can't have people think I'm endorsing you by using the song. He said OK. And that night - he never used it again. That was the end. And I said, are we cool? And he said, Dee, we've done so much charity work together. Of course we're cool.

MARTIN: And that brings us back to where we started - those striking teachers in Oklahoma.

(SOUNDBITE OF BAND MUSIC)

MARTIN: As a band director, how do you think it sounded?

JOEL DEARDORF: Oh, we killed it.

(LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: Joel Deardorf taught music at Norman High School in Oklahoma. He's the one who brought the song to the makeshift marching band there at the state capitol.

DEARDORF: And that was a piece that we played at some football games. My thought was this would be a fantastic, like, so-called fight song. It's the fight song for the walkout.

(SOUNDBITE OF BAND MUSIC, CHEERING)

DEARDORF: I think it gave the walkout another avenue to communicate why we were doing this.

MARTIN: Dee Snider approved.

SNIDER: If it's a voice for the oppressed in any fashion, my job is done.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT")

TWISTED SISTER: (Singing) Anymore, no way.

MARTIN: Twisted Sister broke up at the end of 1987. Dee Snider continued to write anthems, but it was hard to replicate the magic of "We're Not Gonna Take It."

SNIDER: It has transcended the genre. It's transcended the era. It's even transcended the band. And this song will live on long after I am gone. I think as a songwriter, there's no greater compliment.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT")

TWISTED SISTER: (Singing) Oh, oh, oh.

MARTIN: This story and all of the stories from our American Anthem series can be found at nprmusic.org.

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