Letters to God Lost at Sea A minister named Grady Cooper died two years ago. He had served parishioners in Jersey City, N.J. Over the years, hundreds of people sent him prayer letters with requests that he was supposed to pray over. And nobody knows exactly how those letters ended up at sea. A fisherman discovered a bag containing hundreds of notes to Rev. Cooper. Some contain heartbreaking requests. But one came from a man who asked God to let him win the lottery, twice.
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Letters to God Lost at Sea

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Letters to God Lost at Sea

Letters to God Lost at Sea

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A minister named Grady Cooper died two years ago. He had served parishioners in Jersey City, New Jersey. Over the years, hundreds of people sent him prayer letters with requests that he was supposed to pray over. And nobody knows exactly how those letters ended up at sea. A fisherman discovered a bag containing hundreds of notes to Rev. Cooper. Some contained heartbreaking requests. But one came from a man who asked God to let him win the lottery, twice.

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