Voices in the News A montage of voices in the week's news, including: Allan Cheuse; British Prime Minister Tony Blair; Sir Nicholas Stern, chief economic adviser to the U.K. treasury; Sen. John Kerry (D-MA); White House Press Secretary Tony Snow; Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY); President Bush; Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI); Vice President Cheney; unknown translator for Saddam trial.
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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JOHN YDSTIE, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm John Ydstie, and these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. ALLAN CHEUSE (NPR Book Reviewer): Styron was one of those stars I steered by for many years, a novelist who dared to take on the great subjects of his time: slavery, rebellion, the death camps.

Prime Minister TONY BLAIR (United Kingdom): Without radical international measures to reduce carbon emissions within the next 10 to 15 years, there is compelling evidence that this reports provides that we may lose the chance to control temperature rises.

Sir NICHOLAS STERN (Chief Economic Adviser to the U.K. Treasury): We've got a window of 10 or 15 years in order to get going and act strongly. And the later we delay it, the more difficult the problems.

Senator JOHN KERRY (Democrat, Massachusetts): We're here to talk about education, but I want to say something before. You know, education, if you make the most of it and study hard and you do your homework and make an effort to be smart, you can do well. If you don't, you get stuck in Iraq.

Mr. TONY SNOW (White House Press Secretary): America's finest have willingly agreed to volunteer their service in a mission that they know is dangerous but is also important. And you know, Senator Kerry not only owes an apology to those who are serving, but also to the families of those who have given their lives.

Senator CHUCK SCHUMER (Democrat, New York): This election, more and more and more, is becoming a referendum on George Bush, his failed policies, both overseas and here at home, and the rubberstamp Congress.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: When it comes to detaining terrorists, what's a Democrats' answer?

CROWD: Just say no!

President BUSH: When it came time to renew the Patriot Act, what was the Democrats' answer?

CROWD: Just say no!

President BUSH: When it comes time to questioning the terrorists, what's the Democrats' answer?

CROWD: Just say no!

President BUSH: So when the Democrats ask for your vote on November the 7th, what's your answer?

CROWD: No!

Senator CARL LEVIN (Democrat, Michigan): More than anything else, the election on Tuesday will be a decision by the American people as to whether or not they want to change course in Iraq, or whether they want to stay on the current course.

Vice President DICK CHENEY: I think it'll have some of affect perhaps in the Congress. But the president has made clear what his objective is. It's a victory in Iraq. And full speed ahead on that basis.

Unidentified Woman (Translator): The court has decided to judge the sentences, convicted Saddam Hussein al-Majid with death penalty by hanging till death for committing crimes against humanity.

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