Letters: Catholic Mass, School Safety Andrea Seabrook reads letters from listeners. Many of you corrected us on the origins of the Tridentine mass for Roman Catholics, noting that it dates from the mid-16th century. And we hear responses to a story on new approaches to school safety.
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Letters: Catholic Mass, School Safety

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Letters: Catholic Mass, School Safety

Letters: Catholic Mass, School Safety

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ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

Time now for your letters, and we begin with a correction. Many of you wrote in about Rachel Martin's piece two weeks ago on the revival of the Tridentine Mass for Roman Catholics. That's the service spoken in Latin that fell out of favor after the Second Vatican Council in the early '60s. The piece referred to the Tridentine Mass as 1500 years old, and that was an error. The Tridentine Mass was formalized and in fact named for the Council of Trent, which was held in the mid 16th century.

Speaking of papal issues, Sylvia Poggioli's piece last week on Italy's televised satires of Pope Benedict XVI prompted Blythe Walker of Cincinnati to send us a note.

Thank you to the always erudite and insightful Sylvia Poggioli for citing Dante and the Italian literary tradition of social satire dating back to the 14th century in her story of recent papal lampooning on Italian TV. When I first heard the story, I was inspired to revisit my Boccaccio Decameron. In comparison to Boccaccio's bawdy stories, these recent satires are very tame. But it sure does remind one that we human beings haven't progressed so far from our Medieval Renaissance brothers as we'd like to think. We'd do well to read our Dante and Boccaccio more. Viva la trecento.

Phyllis Fletcher's piece last week on new approaches to school safety - included unannounced drills that can be frightening to children - had Sarah Eves(ph) writing to us. I am a teacher at a public school in a rough neighborhood in Sacramento, California, she writes. I work with elementary age children who live with violence on a constant basis. This doesn't mean they're any more prepared for a crisis. By law, we do a monthly fire drill. Coming up, we will do an intruder drill and earthquake drill. However, we have not done a drill that is unannounced. I agree that it's scary for children to do a drill when they don't know if it's real. However, it's crucial for their safety. Since Columbine, I see my job as a protector as well as a teacher.

And finally, a number of you wrote about our interview with guitarist Sanjay Mishra. He wrote a book called "Guitar Atlas: India." While he admits that there are limitations to the standard guitar that make it difficult to play authentic Indian music, he sometimes plays a fretless guitar to better imitate Indian sounds.

Reed Betts(ph) of Crested Butte, Colorado wrote to say how much he enjoyed the piece. What a fantastic way to wake up on Sunday morning. I just finished taking all the frets off my old guitar to experiment with a fretless fingerboard. Can you tell me what brand of guitar Sanjay Mishra plays? The answer: the fretless guitar was built by Canadian maker Robert Godin.

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