Newly Elected County Judge's Online Plans Forced His Resignation Bill McLeod posted that he would one day love to run for Texas' supreme court. The state's constitution says for a county judge to announce candidacy for another office means automatic resignation.
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Newly Elected County Judge's Online Plans Forced His Resignation

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Newly Elected County Judge's Online Plans Forced His Resignation

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Newly Elected County Judge's Online Plans Forced His Resignation

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Bill McLeod was elected county judge in Houston three months ago, and he's already resigned, though without meaning to. He posted online that he would love to, one day, run for state Supreme Court, not realizing what's in the state constitution. It says for a county judge to announce candidacy for another office means automatic resignation. KHOU-TV reports county commissioners do have the power to replace judges, so they could replace Judge McLeod with Judge McLeod.

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