Restaurant Scrambles Does eating Mexican fast-casual food trigger your allergies and have you reaching for an ITCH POLE? Contestants must guess the popular restaurant chain based on anagrams of their names.
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Restaurant Scrambles

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Restaurant Scrambles

Restaurant Scrambles

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Our next two contestants will play a game about chain restaurants. You know what my favorite chain of restaurants are? Speedway, Wawa's (ph), Sheetz, the free sample cart at Costco.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Let's meet our contestants. First up - Kim Souza, you're a reality television postproduction supervisor for four house-hunting shows on HGTV.

KIM SOUZA: Yeah, sure am.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I mean, you know - I mean, so many people are fans of those shows, of course.

SOUZA: Yes.

EISENBERG: And you work in them; it's your day to day. What is one of the bits of television magic that I, as a viewer, would not see on those shows but you know exists all the time?

SOUZA: So the shows are travel-based, in a way.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

SOUZA: You always know which couples are going to kind of, like, buy a house to save their marriage, in a way.

(LAUGHTER)

SOUZA: Like, love on the rocks. But (laughter) other than that, no, it's - anything else, I can't really talk about.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SOUZA: Trade secrets, yeah.

EISENBERG: OK. Kim, when you ring in, we'll hear this.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RING)

EISENBERG: Your opponent is Paige Bowman. You're an executive assistant at Squarespace, and you say a lot of people just assume you can automatically fix all kinds of things, magically.

PAIGE BOWMAN: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Like they say, use your magic.

BOWMAN: Use your magic. And, like, I can't give you a personality.

(LAUGHTER)

JONATHAN COULTON: Wow.

EISENBERG: But what are some of the stranger things that you're having to deal with?

BOWMAN: I mean, it's not strange, but everyone's very busy all day...

EISENBERG: Yeah.

BOWMAN: ...Because we're meeting-heavy. So I'm just like, could you just find two hours for us to sync on this? And it's like, no.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: You sound like a great assistant, Paige.

(LAUGHTER)

BOWMAN: I'm not very good at my job.

(LAUGHTER)

SOUZA: Totally. Totally.

BOWMAN: I hope they're not listening.

EISENBERG: No, nobody from Squarespace will be listening to this.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Shoutout to one of our sponsors - Squarespace.

COULTON: Squarespace.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Paige, when you ring in, we'll hear this.

(SOUNDBITE OF TWO BELL RINGS)

EISENBERG: Remember, Kim and Paige, whoever has more points after two games will go to our final round. Let's go to your first game. OK, are you ready for anagrams?

BOWMAN: Yeah.

SOUZA: Yes.

EISENBERG: Oh, great. This trivia game is called Restaurant Scrambles. We've rearranged the letters in some famous chain restaurants; you're going to ring in and tell us the original restaurant's name.

COULTON: For example, if we said, at Gas If Dirty - celebrate the end of the workweek with a petrol shower and Jack Daniel's chicken and shrimp - you would answer, TGIF Fridays, an anagram of Gas If Dirty.

EISENBERG: Here we go. At the dermatology franchise, Uh Zap Zit, they'll make sure your face doesn't resemble the greasy slices they serve for lunch.

(SOUNDBITE OF TWO BELL RINGS)

EISENBERG: Paige?

BOWMAN: Pizza Hut?

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Actually, in 2011, Pizza Hut accounted for 3 percent of the cheese produced in the United States.

COULTON: Good for them. Congratulations.

EISENBERG: Yeah, yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: At the West Coast fast-food joint, Bun Rerouting, order off the secret menu and get your buns adjusted, animal style.

(SOUNDBITE OF TWO BELL RINGS)

COULTON: Paige?

BOWMAN: In-N-Out Burger?

COULTON: (Laughter) Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: America runs on No Unkind Stud, where shirtless hunks sweetly serve you fried dough and coffee.

(SOUNDBITE OF TWO BELL RINGS)

EISENBERG: Paige?

BOWMAN: Dunkin' Donuts.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Try the veal at Redoing Veal - if the...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: If the cooks don't get it right the first time, they'll make you another one while you munch on unlimited breadsticks; this restaurant serves more than 700 million of them each year.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RING)

EISENBERG: Kim?

SOUZA: Olive Garden.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: On a road trip? Make a stop at Rare Carb Clerk, where after filling up on chicken and dumplings, you can buy rock candy, a cow-shaped soap dispenser and a rocking chair.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RING)

COULTON: Kim?

SOUZA: Cracker Barrel.

COULTON: You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: This is your last clue - at A Bit Cello, you can get your instrument wrapped in a Dorito shell or let this fast-food chain drum up an oboe supreme and a double-decker trumpet.

(SOUNDBITE OF TWO BELL RINGS)

COULTON: Paige?

BOWMAN: Taco Bell.

COULTON: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: OK, great game. Paige is in the lead.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

EISENBERG: Is your brain as spongy as a Panera bread bowl? Then you should be a contestant on our show; go to amatickets.org to find out how. Up next, a game about Broadway musicals. You know, I hate that everyone at a Broadway show has to post a photo of their hand holding the playbill.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It's like, we get it; your hand went to a play. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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