Sunday Puzzle: Cut From The Same Cloth NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro and puzzle master Will Shortz play the puzzle this week with Nicole Johnston of Falls Church, Va.
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Sunday Puzzle: Cut From The Same Cloth

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Sunday Puzzle: Cut From The Same Cloth

Sunday Puzzle: Cut From The Same Cloth

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  • Transcript

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. What was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. I said name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. The two words rhyme respectively with the first and last names of a famous singer. What city is it? And who's the singer? Well, the city is Sioux Falls - largest city in South Dakota. And that rhymes with Lou Rawls.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received over 700 responses. And our winner this week is Nicole Johnston of Falls Church, Va. Congratulations.

NICOLE JOHNSTON: Thank you very much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So how'd you figure it out?

JOHNSTON: Well, what I did - I went to the computer, and I called up a list in alphabetical order of all the cities of 100,000 population or more in the United States. And I read down the list until I hit one that rhymed with a singer I had heard of. Lou Rawls was somebody I used to see on variety shows growing up in the '60s, so I figured that must be it (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And you were right. And I'm told you're a musician.

JOHNSTON: I play guitar or I attempt to play guitar. I've been doing it a long time. It amuses me, if nothing else. Sometimes - I've been in bands in the past. But currently, I'm just, you know, enjoying playing by myself.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wonderful. Well, are you ready to play The Puzzle?

JOHNSTON: I am.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK. Will, take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Nicole. I like that enthusiasm. Every answer today is the name of a fabric or a clothing material. You name it from its anagram. For example, if I said clean - C-L-E-A-N - minus N, you would say lace. So number one is likes - L-I-K-E-S - minus E.

JOHNSTON: Oh, L-I-K-S. Let's see.

SHORTZ: Yeah. What fabric is that?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It's pricey.

JOHNSTON: Oh, silk.

SHORTZ: Silk is it, good. You're off and running. Number two is on low, like you have your stove on low, minus N.

JOHNSTON: Oh, Orlan.

SHORTZ: No.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You wear it in winter.

SHORTZ: You wear it in winter. Get rid of the N - O-L-O-W.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Imitating sheep).

JOHNSTON: Oh, wool (laughter).

SHORTZ: Wool is it, good. Your next one is notary - N-O-T-A-R-Y - minus T.

JOHNSTON: Rayon.

SHORTZ: Rayon is it. Maiden - M-A-I-D-E-N - minus A.

JOHNSTON: Denim.

SHORTZ: Good. Antics - A-N-T-I-C-S - minus C.

JOHNSTON: Oh, satin.

SHORTZ: Good. Archly - A-R-C-H-L-Y - minus H.

JOHNSTON: Oh, A-R-C-L-Y.

SHORTZ: It's a human-made fabric or material.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And you wear it to work out.

JOHNSTON: Lycra.

SHORTZ: Lycra, nice. Recipe - R-E-C-I-P-E - minus I.

JOHNSTON: Oh, crepe.

SHORTZ: Nice. Contort - C-O-N-T-O-R-T - minus R; one of the most basic fabrics.

JOHNSTON: Cotton.

SHORTZ: Cotton is it. Caldron - that's C-A-L-D-R-O-N, minus L.

JOHNSTON: Oh, nylon. No, not nylon.

SHORTZ: No, but you do have the right ending. Its O-N, and it's a human-made...

JOHNSTON: Dacron.

SHORTZ: Dacron, nice. Here's your next one. Rematches - R-E-M-A-T-C-H-E-S - minus T.

JOHNSTON: OK.

SHORTZ: It's something you might have a nice sweater made of.

JOHNSTON: Cashmere.

SHORTZ: Nice, and here's your last one - your crowd - Y-O-U-R C-R-O-W-D - minus W.

JOHNSTON: Oh, that's...

SHORTZ: It's a heavy-ish fabric especially used for pants, I'd say.

JOHNSTON: Corduroy.

SHORTZ: Corduroy - good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job. How do you feel?

JOHNSTON: Pretty good - better than I thought I would do.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did great. And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, Nicole, which member station do you listen to?

JOHNSTON: WAMU FM in Washington, D.C.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, our hometown station. That's Nicole Johnston of Falls Church, Va. Thank you for playing The Puzzle.

JOHNSTON: Thank you. It was an honor.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, tell us next week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener James Matthews of Little Rock, Ark. And to solve it, you might need to crack open an atlas. Take the names of two countries that share a border. Drop the second letter from the second country's name, and the resulting string of letters, in order from left to right, will spell a regular, uncapitalized word. What is it? So again, two countries that share a border - drop the second letter from the second country's name, and the resulting string of letters from left or right will spell a regular, uncapitalized word. What word is it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember; just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, June 27 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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