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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Faith, you know that feeling when you wake up and you have no idea where you are or how you got there? Well, a woman in Canada experienced that in real life when she woke up where?

FAITH SALIE: Oh, wasn't she stuck on a plane?

SAGAL: Yes.

SALIE: Yeah.

SAGAL: She woke up in an empty airplane.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: She fell asleep, and when she woke up, she was still strapped in her seat. It was freezing cold in the pitch dark on this entirely empty plane parked on some edge of a runway somewhere.

SALIE: And the crew just...

SAGAL: Gone.

SALIE: ...Ignored her?

SAGAL: Everybody was gone. The plane was locked. It was empty.

SALIE: Wow.

SAGAL: It was totally terrifying because the woman realized she'd never be this comfortable in a plane ever again.

(LAUGHTER)

LUKE BURBANK: Yeah, it was crazy because her phone had a little bit of battery life...

SAGAL: Yeah.

BURBANK: So she FaceTimed her friend and said, I'm on an airplane still somewhere. And then the phone died, and she couldn't charge it because the phone does not...

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Oh, my gosh.

BURBANK: The power doesn't work on the airplane if it's off.

SALIE: Oh, my gosh.

SAGAL: Right.

BURBANK: So she went, opened the door of the plane - which was, like, 50 feet off the ground - and just sat there swinging her legs, trying to do SOS with a flashlight she found in the cockpit.

SALIE: Really?

SAGAL: Yes.

POUNDSTONE: Wow.

SAGAL: This is all true. But first, what she did was she decided to enjoy herself, and she went to the galley, and she poured herself a whole can of soda.

SALIE: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: She used all the armrests.

SAGAL: Yeah.

BURBANK: Yeah.

SAGAL: She would have used the emergency door except she hadn't given a verbal yes...

BURBANK: Yeah.

SAGAL: ...So she couldn't.

POUNDSTONE: I can certainly imagine that happening - falling asleep and waking up in the dark on the airplane with no one there. Yeah.

SAGAL: The thing is, if I was in an airplane and I had to get off, absolutely I would, like, inflate that slide thing.

BURBANK: Oh, yeah.

SAGAL: Woo-hoo.

POUNDSTONE: Oh, that's a good point.

SAGAL: Yeah.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah. Or put the seat back.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: All the way.

POUNDSTONE: What, does it go back a quarter of an inch? Woo.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ALL BY MYSELF")

ERIC CARMEN: (Singing) All by myself, don't want to be all by myself anymore.

SAGAL: Coming up, we take to the streets to protest our own Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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