How A 1911 Sweatshop Fire Led To One Of 2019's Best Albums : Deceptive Cadence On her new album, Fire in My Mouth, the Pulitzer-winning composer documents the tragedy behind New York City's 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire.
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Tragic Fire Sparks Julia Wolfe's Latest Look At American Labor History

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Tragic Fire Sparks Julia Wolfe's Latest Look At American Labor History

Review

Tragic Fire Sparks Julia Wolfe's Latest Look At American Labor History

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Julia Wolfe might be called America's labor documentarian. And she's not making movies. She writes music.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ANTHRACITE FIELDS: IV. FLOWERS")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) (Unintelligible) flowers.

KELLY: Wolfe won a Pulitzer Prize for this work, "Anthracite Fields," about Pennsylvania coal miners. She also wrote a piece spotlighting Appalachian workers. Now, a new album called "Fire In My Mouth" features her latest look at American labor history. NPR's Tom Huizenga has this review.

TOM HUIZENGA, BYLINE: Julia Wolfe's new album documents one of the most tragic and deadly workplace disasters in American history.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) Fire.

HUIZENGA: And the music performed by the New York Philharmonic, the choir called The Crossing and the Young People's Chorus of New York City is among the most arresting she's composed.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) Fire.

HUIZENGA: Those voices are screaming Fire.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) Fire, fire.

HUIZENGA: On March 25, 1911, the top floors of the Ash Building in New York's Greenwich Village burst into flames. They were home to the Triangle Shirtwaist Company, a sweatshop where immigrants toiled under harsh and crowded conditions. One hundred forty-six workers died, some of them after jumping from the building. Almost all of them were women.

"Fire In My Mouth" traces their stories. Wolfe draws on oral histories, Italian and Yiddish folk tunes from their homelands and the sound of sewing machines buzzing on the factory floor.

(SOUNDBITE OF JULIA WOLFE SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

HUIZENGA: The immigrant workers had no rights and no protections, but one who fought to gain those rights was Clara Lemlich. The labor organizer suffered broken ribs at the hands of hired thugs during a strike. And in her, Wolfe found the title of her piece and a high point in the music. The orchestra pulses and swirls around a quote from an interview Lemlich gave, referring to her impassioned public speeches - then I had fire in my mouth.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) Then I had fire in my mouth.

HUIZENGA: Wolfe's 50-minute long oratorio is not all fright and frenzied music. There are subtle, evocative touches of orchestration and vocalizing. In the opening section, immigrants on the boat speak of their 10-day journey to America, dreaming of a land without poverty and persecution as the glassy ocean stretches out before them.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing) We took a boat and (unintelligible).

HUIZENGA: Wolfe uses 146 female singers, same as the number of workers who died in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. The piece closes solemnly with a recitation of all their names.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing, unintelligible).

HUIZENGA: A few months after the fire, New York passed important factory safety laws. Once again, it took a tragedy to force change. But "Fire In My Mouth" seems to ask, how much has really changed? By shining a light on immigrants, their resilience and their broken lives, Julia Wolfe's powerful oratorio set in 1911 resonates in America today.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing, unintelligible).

KELLY: The album is "Fire In My Mouth," composed by Julia Wolfe. Our reviewer is NPR's Tom Huizenga.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRE IN MY MOUTH")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGERS: (Singing, unintelligible).

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