Round One Storm of controversy
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Round One

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Round One

Round One

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BILL KURTIS: This summer's been pretty full - so full, in fact, that we had to edit out part of it. Here's a question we asked Roy Blount Jr. a couple of months ago that we didn't have time to broadcast.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Roy, we've had an intense tornado season. But so far, meteorological technology has allowed people to be warned in time. One problem, though - residents of tornado-prone areas are complaining that the tornado warnings are doing what?

ROY BLOUNT JR: Scaring the chickens.

SAGAL: No.

BLOUNT JR: Scaring the cows.

SAGAL: No.

BLOUNT JR: Give me a hint.

SAGAL: It's not scaring any livestock at all.

(LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT JR: I had a lot - several other livestock I was going to...

(LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT JR: The tornado warnings are interfering with Rush Limbaugh.

SAGAL: You're so close I'm going to give it to you. They're interrupting their TV shows.

BLOUNT JR: Ah.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It started a couple of weeks ago when a station in Ohio interrupted "The Bachelorette" to warn people to, for God's sake, take cover.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And countless people contacted the TV station not to thank them for saving their lives but to tell them to stop with the warnings until we find out which of these identical asshats is going home with her.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Also, my TV is flying away. Can you do anything about that?

(LAUGHTER)

JORDAN CARLOS: But here's the question - was that done in the middle of a rose ceremony? I mean...

SAGAL: Yeah, I know.

CARLOS: Let's get real. You know, you're holding five roses, and there's six of them. Like, do not give me the weather report, OK?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: By the way, if you're wondering why there's so many tornadoes, a guy called into a Pennsylvania weather station, and he had the solution. It's because of all the roundabouts, the traffic circles.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: He pointed out you have - all the sudden, you've got all these new roundabouts, you've got all these cars going in circles. It swirls the air...

HELEN HONG: I agree.

SAGAL: And you have tornadoes.

HONG: I hate those things.

SAGAL: Yeah.

CARLOS: Yeah.

SAGAL: Yeah. So just next time you see a roundabout, save the country - drive straight through.

CARLOS: Straight through.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: When we come back, the Beastie Boys and the very fierce girl, Lindy West. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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