Fluorescent Bulbs: A Better Idea? The debut of the "18 Seconds Movement" encourages Americans to replace incandescent light bulbs with more energy-efficient "compact fluorescent bulbs." You'll see ads on the Internet and in movie theaters.
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Fluorescent Bulbs: A Better Idea?

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Fluorescent Bulbs: A Better Idea?

Fluorescent Bulbs: A Better Idea?

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our last word in business is about saving money and energy and stopping global warming. A new campaign starts today aimed at encouraging Americans to replace their old incandescent light bulbs with more energy-efficient compact fluorescent lights. The campaign involves ads on the Internet and in movie theatres. Behind the new push: conservation groups, government agencies and some big companies, including Wal-Mart, which, by the way, sells the energy-saving fluorescent bulbs.

There is one hitch. Compact fluorescent bulbs contain small amounts of mercury. Industry and the government haven't yet figured how to effectively recycle them.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. With Steve Inskeep, I'm Renee Montagne.

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