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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We're playing this week with Peter Grosz, Helen Hong and Adam Felber. And here again is your host at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you, Bill. In just a minute, Bill gets with the program in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Adam, a New York City delivery driver has been convicted for a heist in which he stole $90,000 of what?

ADAM FELBER: Crepes - cakes.

SAGAL: Yes, cakes - exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: He stole the cakes from Lady M - sounds like a dominatrix. It's actually a high-end bakery in New York City.

FELBER: I've never heard of it.

PETER GROSZ: Can't it be both?

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: Can't it be a dominatrix and a high-end bakery?

SAGAL: Turns out they do whip their customers so, you know - anyway, their cakes retail for 90 bucks for a 9-inch cake. And the thief stole more than a thousand of them from company freezers and resold them on the black market. It was brilliant how he stole the cakes. He snuck them out hidden inside a nail file.

(LAUGHTER)

HELEN HONG: I don't think I would buy a cake on the black market.

GROSZ: I was about to...

SAGAL: Well, we were wondering about that.

SAGAL: Well, we were wondering about that?

BILL KURTIS: (Laughter).

GROSZ: I was about to say...

HONG: Like, who...

GROSZ: ...What is the black market for cakes? Like, I see, like, human organs or something like that or, like, drugs or weapons.

HONG: Can you imagine being on the subway, and some guy's like, want some cake?

(LAUGHTER)

HONG: What? Ew.

SAGAL: Yeah. I got a cake. They fell off a truck...

GROSZ: Yeah.

SAGAL: ...You know?

FELBER: I like how Peter asked, like, who would buy a black-market cake? And, like, half this Jersey audience went silent.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

FELBER: Nobody - that's who? Shut up.

SAGAL: Peter, according to a new survey, most people say they get their best and most creative ideas where?

GROSZ: I'm going to go with on the toilet, Peter.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No. Surprisingly, no.

GROSZ: No.

FELBER: I flipped over my card. I had written the same thing.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: They get their most creative ideas in the shower.

SAGAL: No. That's not - that was not No. 1.

GROSZ: While running, during sex...

FELBER: Wow. No.

GROSZ: ...Sleeping...

SAGAL: Yes.

GROSZ: Sleeping.

SAGAL: In bed.

GROSZ: Oh.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: I'll give it to you.

GROSZ: In bed - OK.

SAGAL: In bed is the answer. Crawl in to bed, cozy up with a new idea or maybe just stare at your phone for 45 minutes reading where the cast of "Gilmore Girls" is now. That's up to you.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Bad news on that front.

SAGAL: Yeah. According to a new survey, people think they come up with their best ideas before, after or even during sleep. So technically, that means that hitting the snooze button and going back to sleep is always a good idea.

GROSZ: Wait - during sleep? So, like, one of my best ideas is like, I - I'm in a play, but I don't know my lines.

SAGAL: Exactly.

GROSZ: And I walk out on stage, and I'm naked.

SAGAL: Right.

GROSZ: And everyone's looking at me. And Martin Luther King is there for some reason.

FELBER: That's a good...

GROSZ: That's my best idea?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That's your best work.

FELBER: That's a good idea.

GROSZ: That's my best idea.

HONG: We could try half of it right now.

GROSZ: Yeah. OK.

SAGAL: This is great, though. It means sleeping all day doesn't mean you're depressed. It means you're brainstorming.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: Yeah. But, like, I can see, like, a couple getting into bed. And one's, like, you know - wants to get a little randy. And the other one's like, no. I'm thinking. I'm having a bunch of good ideas.

(LAUGHTER)

HONG: It's one thing...

SAGAL: Oh, God - another excuse.

GROSZ: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

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