Cheney Pushes Pakistan to Fight Al-Qaida Vice President Dick Cheney visits Pakistan, seeking help in countering al-Qaida's efforts to regroup in the region. However, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf insists his forces have already done as much as possible against extremists in their territory.
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Cheney Pushes Pakistan to Fight Al-Qaida

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Cheney Pushes Pakistan to Fight Al-Qaida

Cheney Pushes Pakistan to Fight Al-Qaida

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

And I'm Michele Norris.

BLOCK: NPR's Don Gonyea reports.

DON GONYEA: Along the way, Cheney has been talking and talking tough, accusing Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Congressman Jack Murtha of pushing a policy that would validate al-Qaida strategy. In Sydney, he described what would happen if the U.S. were to pull out of Iraq.

DICK CHENEY: Having tasted victory in Iraq, jihadists would look for new missions. Many would head for Afghanistan to fight alongside the Taliban. Others would set out for capitals across the Middle East, spreading more sorrow and discord as they eliminate the dissenters and work to undermine moderate governments.

GONYEA: Back at the White House, Press Secretary Tony Snow seemed determined, though, to downplay any suggestion of an ultimatum.

TONY SNOW: And it's a - it's an important element in the larger war on terror.

GONYEA: Don Gonyea, NPR News, the White House.

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