World's Loudest Bird Could Cause Hearing Damage To Humans According to a new study in Current Biology, the male white bellbird when singing its mating call produces the loudest bird song. The bird lives in the mountains of the Amazon rainforest.
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World's Loudest Bird Could Cause Hearing Damage To Humans

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World's Loudest Bird Could Cause Hearing Damage To Humans

World's Loudest Bird Could Cause Hearing Damage To Humans

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. OK. Get ready. We're going to play you now the sound of the world's loudest bird.

(SOUNDBITE OF BIRD CALLING)

MARTIN: According to a new study in Current Biology, the male white bellbird, when singing its mating call, produces the loudest birdsong. The white bellbird lives in the mountains of the Amazon rainforest. Be warned - the bird is so loud it could cause hearing damage to humans standing nearby.

(SOUNDBITE OF BIRD CALLING)

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