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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Josh, turns out great white sharks are just like us.

JOSH GONDELMAN: I knew it.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I don't have a question. I just wanted to tell you that. Now we're moving on.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No. Great white sharks sometimes like to have what?

GONDELMAN: Brunch.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know what? I'm just going to give it to you because I don't know when in the day they're doing it. We were looking for dinner parties.

GONDELMAN: Yeah...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

GONDELMAN: Dinner parties.

SAGAL: Could be brunch.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: We don't know.

GONDELMAN: I - accidentally getting it right. I'm...

SAGAL: It's perfectly fine. I didn't...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Want to - I didn't want to, like, have to hint you to another meal.

GONDELMAN: (Laughter) I get to my meals just fine, thank you.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So great white sharks are stereotypically loners. They hunt on their own for seals and Richard Dreyfuss.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But a new study out of Australia says that four or five times a year, great whites get together with other great whites they've known for a while, and they share a meal - you know, a little baby seal, a little seawater to drink. Everything's great. But then it all falls apart when Phil (ph) over there gets drunk, cuts himself on a glass, and another feeding frenzy breaks out.

(LAUGHTER)

GONDELMAN: Three or four times a year just makes me feel bad for how infrequently I see some of my friends.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Isn't it terrible?

GONDELMAN: It's, like, sharks have a better social life than me. That's...

SAGAL: I know. It's really sad, yeah.

NEGIN FARSAD: So does that mean they see each other seasonally...

SAGAL: Yeah.

FARSAD: ...And then the rest of the year, they don't see...

SAGAL: Yeah.

FARSAD: ...Each other?

SAGAL: But that was what was so surprising because they didn't - I mean, sharks don't normally travel...

PJ O'ROURKE: So it's like in-laws.

SAGAL: Little bit.

FARSAD: Are they - OK, are sharks having sex?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I assume so because of the existence of more sharks.

GONDELMAN: Yeah, that's where baby shark comes from.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BABY SHARK (FITNESS VERSION 128 BPM)")

ZIPPERS: (Singing) Mommy shark, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo. Mommy shark, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo. Mommy shark, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, mommy shark. Baby shark, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo. Baby shark, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo. Baby shark, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo.

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists don't need any help lying to you. They do it themselves in our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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