Make It a Double Finalists go double-or-nothing in a quiz where every answer begins with "double."
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Make It a Double

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Make It a Double

Make It a Double

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

It's time to crown our big winner. Let's bring back our finalists - Hannah Corrigan, who discovered it is physically impossible to Bedazzle an umbrella hat, and Diana Hirota, who is a deceitful optometrist.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Hannah, Diana, your final round is called Make It A Double. Every answer begins with the word double. Our big winner will receive an ASK ME ANOTHER Rubik's Cube signed by John Cameron Mitchell. We rolled a 20-sided die backstage, and Diana is going first. Remember, every answer begins with double. Here we go.

Diana, two jump ropes are used in this schoolyard activity, which is recognized as a varsity sport in New York public schools.

DIANA HIROTA: Double Dutch.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Hannah, in fashion, this type of tape is used to secure strapless dresses.

HANNAH CORRIGAN: Double-sided tape.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Diana, on a standard Scrabble board, the center square with a star awards this bonus.

HIROTA: Double points.

EISENBERG: I need you to be more specific.

HIROTA: Double word score.

EISENBERG: That's correct, yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Hannah, this inaccurate term describes someone who's hyper-flexible, like Demi Lovato, who can twist her arms more than 180 degrees.

CORRIGAN: Double-jointed.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jonathan Coulton, how are our contestants doing?

JONATHAN COULTON: Well, it is a tie game so far.

HIROTA: Diana, the Fifth Amendment says a person can't be prosecuted twice for the same crime, a concept also known as this.

EISENBERG: Double jeopardy.

HIROTA: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Hannah, this spooky 1993 Olsen twins movie takes its title from something the witches in Macbeth say.

CORRIGAN: "Double Trouble."

EISENBERG: Close - the answer is "Double, Double, Toil And Trouble." Diana, this 2019 MTV dating show revival starred "Jersey Shore" cast members Pauly D and Vinny.

HIROTA: "Double Dating."

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Good guess. We were looking for "A Double Shot At Love."

HIROTA: (Laughter).

EISENBERG: Hannah, when you're 46 weeks back in your crush's Instagram, you might want to avoid using this smartphone shortcut to like a photo.

CORRIGAN: Double-tap.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: All right. Jonathan Coulton, we are halfway through. How are our contestants doing?

COULTON: Pretty well. It is a tied game. It's 3-3.

EISENBERG: Diana, Pat Smear of the Foo Fighters and Don Felder of the Eagles famously wield a guitar with this feature.

HIROTA: Double frets.

EISENBERG: Actually, we were looking for a double neck or double-necked.

HIROTA: Oh, neck.

EISENBERG: Hannah, complete this lyric from Missy Elliott's "Lose Control." Rump shaking both ways, make you do a...

CORRIGAN: Double-take.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Diana, in baseball, it's when two runners are thrown out, abbreviated in scoring as DP.

HIROTA: Double play.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Hannah, also in baseball, it's when two games are played back-to-back on the same day with the same two teams.

CORRIGAN: Double header.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: All right - only a few questions left. Jonathan, how are our contestants doing?

COULTON: Well, here's the situation.

CORRIGAN: (Laughter).

COULTON: Hannah has pulled in the lead. It's 5 to 4.

EISENBERG: Diana, when Mick Jagger said, I can't get no satisfaction, he committed this grammar sin.

HIROTA: Double negative.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Hannah, this 1986 Nickelodeon game show revived in 2018 often featured a trip to space camp as its grand prize.

CORRIGAN: "Double Dare."

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: All right, Jonathan, what's the situation?

COULTON: All right, you each have one question left. Diana, to stay in the game, you have to answer this question right, and Hannah has to miss her question.

EISENBERG: Diana, this blue and yellow twist-wrapped gum was part of U.S. military rations in World War II.

HIROTA: Doublemint Gum.

EISENBERG: I'm sorry. The answer was Dubble Bubble, which means Hannah is our big winner.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Diana, thank you so much. You were an awesome contender. And congratulations, Hannah.

That's our show. Our podcast drops each Friday. Listen and subscribe. ASK ME ANOTHER's house musician is Jonathan Coulton.

COULTON: Hey. My name anagrams to thou jolt a cannon.

EISENBERG: Our puzzles were written by Camilla Franklin, Sean Gaul (ph), Ruth Morrison (ph) and senior writer Karen Lurie, with additional material by Cara Weinberger and Emily Winter. Our senior supervising producer is Rachel Neel. ASK ME ANOTHER's produced by Mike Katzif, Travis Larchuk, Kiara Powell (ph), Nancy Saechao, Rommel Wood and our intern Natalie Hitayen (ph), along with Steve Nelson and Anya Grundmann. We are recorded by Damon Whittemore, Jay Russo (ph) and Rachel Hermann (ph). We'd like to thank our home in Brooklyn, N.Y., the Bell House...

COULTON: Hot heel blues.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: ...And our production partner WNYC. I'm her ripe begonias.

COULTON: Ophira Eisenberg.

EISENBERG: And this was ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

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