A Look Back At President Trump's Impeachment Trial We look back on how the impeachment trial of President Trump unfolded.
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A Look Back At President Trump's Impeachment Trial

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A Look Back At President Trump's Impeachment Trial

A Look Back At President Trump's Impeachment Trial

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

NANCY PELOSI: On this vote, the yeas are 229; the nays are 198; present is 1. Article 2 is adopted.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

On December 18, 2019, the House of Representatives approved two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump - one for abuse of power and the second for obstruction of justice. More than a month later, the Senate impeachment trial began.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MICHAEL STENGER: Hear ye, hear ye, hear ye. All persons are commanded to keep silent on pain of imprisonment while the Senate of the United States is sitting for the trial of the articles of impeachment.

MONTAGNE: Each side - the House impeachment managers and the president's defense team - had up to 24 hours over three days to make their case. Democratic Representative Adam Schiff opened the arguments.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ADAM SCHIFF: President Trump has acted in a manner grossly incompatible with self-governance. His conduct has violated his oath of office and his constitutional duty to faithfully execute the law.

MONTAGNE: President Trump's defense lawyers then got their shot, beginning with White House counsel Pat Cipollone.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PAT CIPOLLONE: They're asking you to tear up all of the ballots across this country on your own initiative, take that decision away from the American people.

MONTAGNE: After sitting silently for more than a week, senators then got to ask questions in writing to be read aloud by Chief Justice John Roberts.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN ROBERTS: As a matter of law, does it matter if there was a quid pro quo? Is it true that quid pro quos are often used in foreign policy?

MONTAGNE: Yesterday, senators wrangled over the question of calling new witnesses and introducing new documents. Democrats argued in favor.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

VAL DEMINGS: Is this a fair trial without the ability to call witnesses and produce documents? The answer is clearly and unequivocally no.

MONTAGNE: Trump's team only used a sliver of their time to push back.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JAY SEKULOW: I could stand here for a long time. I'm not going to do that. I'm just going to say this. They created the record. Do not allow them to penalize the country and the Constitution because they failed to do their job.

MONTAGNE: In the end, senators ultimately voted against the measure.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ROBERTS: The yeas are 49; the nays are 51. The motion is not agreed to.

MONTAGNE: Later, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell then announced the final vote on impeachment will be held next Wednesday.

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