Panel Question Life is exhausting
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Panel Question

Panel Question

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

As we all know, there is nothing more presidential than an insane rant, and our insane ranter in chief is Paula Poundstone. Here's a never-before-heard question we posed to Paula, and she instinctually knew the answer.

Paula, according to a new study, most adults are generally too tired to do what?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Anything.

SAGAL: That is exactly right.

POUNDSTONE: Whoa. Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: A British survey of 2,000 people showed most adults are too exhausted to do anything - cook, socialize, come up with a funny third example.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Many of the participants reported canceling dates because they, quote, "couldn't bring themselves to leave the house."

POUNDSTONE: I hear you, 2,000 British people.

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: There are times that I just don't eat...

SAGAL: Really?

POUNDSTONE: ...Because - yeah, because...

SAGAL: It's too exhausting.

POUNDSTONE: I know you're looking at me, going, really? Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: You could look a little less surprised, Mr. Sagal.

UNIDENTIFIED PANELIST: The first thing Paula told me when I saw her today was, like, I just eight two Three Musketeers bars.

POUNDSTONE: Yes, because they were easy to acquire.

SAGAL: Not to mention the preparation is so simple.

POUNDSTONE: Did I tell you I ate the wrapper?

SAGAL: When we come back, an Iowa bureaucrat loses his job, and a treetop biologist pushes around the Mattel Toy Company. We'll be back in a minute with more WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME! from NPR.

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