Broadway History Don't know much about history? Your love of musical theater can save you in this quiz about historical events as described by show tunes.
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Broadway History

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Broadway History

Broadway History

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

This next game is about musicals based on historic events like the assassination of Mufasa.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: We'll play a snippet from a musical. You just tell us what real person, place, or event from history is being sung about. Dhanya, stay in the lead and you're in the final round. Elizabeth, you need to get more points, or we will replace your cat with James Corden.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Here we go.

What are these poor dopes so excited about in this musical about a disaster in 1912?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THERE SHE IS")

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP #1: (As characters, singing) And I'll be aboard that ship of dreams.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth.

ELIZABETH FILIPOVICH: The "Titanic."

EISENBERG: That is correct. Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: In the musical "Annie," what president are these people blaming for the loss of their wealth during the Great Depression?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WE'D LIKE TO THANK YOU, HERBERT HOOVER")

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP #2: (As characters, singing) You left behind a grateful nation, so, Herb, our hats are off to you. We got no turkey for our stuffing. Why don't we stuff you?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth.

FILIPOVICH: Herbert Hoover.

EISENBERG: That is correct, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Sucked up all the money. OK. Who is being sung about in this clip from "Ragtime"?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HENRY FORD")

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP #3: (As characters, singing) Hallelujah. Praise the maker of the model T.

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As Ford, singing) Speed up the belt. Speed up the belt, Sam.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth.

FILIPOVICH: Henry Ford.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's correct - Henry Ford.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Oh, do you think there's going to be a "Ford v Ferrari" musical? There's totally...

JONATHAN COULTON, BYLINE: Probably eventually.

EISENBERG: ...Going to be - yeah. All right. This is your last clue. What's being fought about in this song from 1776?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BUT, MR. ADAMS")

HOWARD DA SILVA: (As Franklin, singing) Mr. Adams, I say you should write it. To your legal mind and brilliance we defer.

WILLIAM DANIELS: (As Adams, singing) Is that so? Well, if I'm the one to do it, they'll run their quill pens through it. I'm obnoxious and disliked, you know that, sir.

DA SILVA: (As Franklin) Yes, I know.

DANIELS: (As Adams, singing) But I say you should write it, Franklin. Yes, you.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Dhanya.

DHANYA SRIDHAR: The Declaration of Independence.

EISENBERG: That is correct, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right - great game. Both of you are amazing. Those are two really hard games, so well done, both of you.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And looks like after two games, Elizabeth is going to the final round.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

EISENBERG: Do you have what it takes to be an ASK ME ANOTHER contestant? Prove it. Go to amatickets.org to apply. Coming up, I'll talk to electro-pop musician and composer Dan Deacon and challenge him to a game about board games. Forget astrology - you know exactly who you are by the Monopoly piece you choose. You may think you're a thimble, but you're a top hat.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

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