Panel Questions Wash your hands with Bill Kurtis.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

And now it's time for a new part of our show that we're calling...

BILL KURTIS: Wash your hands with me, Bill Kurtis.

SAGAL: As a public service for you, our listeners, we're all going to take a moment to just wash our hands right now. And the most effective way is with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds. And to help us along, Bill Kurtis here is going to sing you one of his favorite handwashing songs. Hit it, Bill.

KURTIS: Thank you, Peter. Ready, everyone?

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

KURTIS: Ain't nobody dope as me - my hands so fresh, so clean. So fresh and so clean - clean. Don't you think I'm so sexy - my hands so fresh, so clean? Ain't nobody dope as me - my hands so fresh, so clean thanks to me, Bill Kurtis.

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Wow.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: That was great, Bill. I think we all now feel very fresh and very clean and just a little bit dirty.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SO FRESH, SO CLEAN")

OUTKAST: (Singing) Ain't nobody dope as me, I'm dressed so fresh and so - fresh and so clean, clean. I love when you stare at...

SAGAL: Coming up, the people demand our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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