How To Make (And Wear) A Face Mask The federal government is weighing whether to urge all Americans to wear masks when they leave their homes. Here's how to make and wear them.
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How To Make (And Wear) A Face Mask

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How To Make (And Wear) A Face Mask

How To Make (And Wear) A Face Mask

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Whether officials recommend all Americans to wear masks or not, many people are taking to making their own.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The Internet, naturally, is full of patterns and tutorials.

KELLY: Not all of these designs are created equal, though. The best mask you can make is one that fits snugly on your face. So a loosely wrapped scarf will not do the trick.

CHANG: If you can sew, cut up an old T-shirt or sheets and follow a pattern with pleats. Those allow the mask to form to your face.

KELLY: If you can't sew, take something that's already the right size, like a bandana. Once you have a piece of fabric that covers your mouth and your nose, you need to secure it over your ears.

CHANG: For that, you can use elastic or even rubber bands.

KELLY: Remember - the main potential benefit of wearing a mask is that it might help keep you from infecting other people if you're sick and you don't know it.

(SOUNDBITE OF DURAND JONES AND THE INDICATIONS SONG, "MORNING IN AMERICA")

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