VA Provides Transportation to Therapy Sessions The Cincinnati Veterans Administration says it will start giving a veteran with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder a ride to his weekly therapy appointment. Johnny Waltz, who served in the Navy in both Afghanistan and Iraq, said he had no trouble getting appointments at the V.A. — he just couldn't get to the sessions.
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VA Provides Transportation to Therapy Sessions

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VA Provides Transportation to Therapy Sessions

VA Provides Transportation to Therapy Sessions

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Earlier this week, we told you about an Iraq vet with post-traumatic stress disorder who needed treatment at a VA clinic, but he had no way to get there. Then our story aired. NPR's Joseph Shapiro reports.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO: Officials at the Department of Veterans Affairs had told Johnny Waltz he didn't qualify for the agency's free van service. Yesterday, that changed. Waltz spoke to us from his kitchen as he put lunch in the microwave for his young daughters.

Mr. JOHNNY WALTZ (Iraq War Veteran): And then I got a surprise call from Cincinnati VA that said, oh, you know, if you need transportation, you know, it's no problem. So I don't know what the change was from saying there wasn't any transportation available to now there is.

SHAPIRO: Waltz can't drive because he has seizures, which doctors say are caused by his PTSD. His wife can't drive him anymore. She had to go back to work when the seizures forced her husband to quit his job. After our story, Waltz got offers from a dozen nearby citizens, too. He's not sure whose offer he'll take when he goes to his therapy appointment next week, but he's feeling more optimistic.

Mr. WALTZ: It means a lot. You know, now it's two weeks in a row of getting my therapy, and it does a lot for me personally and my PTSD treatment, especially, you know, with anger, being able to talk about these and get my therapy. So it means a lot.

SHAPIRO: A VA spokesman said the agency would contact the people who offered to give Waltz a ride and try to set up a network of volunteers to drive other veterans who still lack transportation. Joseph Shapiro, NPR News.

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