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BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Time to put your money where your mouth is. That's the message from the head of the World Bank about how the international community needs to step up and deal with what has become a global food crisis. Yesterday, World Bank President Robert Zoellick called on governments to rapidly carry out commitments to provide the UN World Food Programme with 500 million dollars in emergency aid. He says rising food prices are pushing more people into poverty.

(Soundbite of press conference)

Mr. ROBERT ZOELLICK (President, World Bank): Based on a very rough analysis, we estimate that a doubling of food prices over the last three years could potentially push 100 million people in low-income countries deeper into poverty.

MARTIN: Zoellick spoke as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund concluded their spring meetings in Washington this weekend. The rising cost of food has caused deadly violence in several countries, including Haiti, where the prime minister was ousted after a week of food related rioting that has left at least five people dead. Later in the show, we'll explain why the food crisis is coming to a head now.

After a month-long power struggle, Kenya's President Mwai Kibaki, and his main political rival, Raila Odinga, have named a National Unity cabinet. Kibaki was declared the winner of the vote back in December that international observers say was flawed.

So the president's allies retain the most powerful ministries like finance and foreign affairs, while Odinga, who claims to have won the presidential vote, was appointed prime minister. The U.S. and other governments have been pressuring Kenya to reach a power-sharing deal to end this stalemate and violence in which more than a thousand people were killed.

To this country now and that west Texas polygamist compound that was raided last week. The mothers of some of the hundreds of children removed from the compound have written to Texas Governor Rick Perry asking for help in regaining custody of their daughters and sons.

The letter claims many of the children have become sick as a result of their new living situations. Meanwhile, authorities are analyzing information from cell phones and other devices seized from the compound. From member station KUT in Austin, here's Matt Largey.

MATT LARGEY: A judge ordered all phones and electronic devices taken away from the hundreds of women and children removed from a ranch run by the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The order was requested by court appointed lawyers for 18 of the more than 400 girls now under state protection. Patrick Crimmins is a spokesman for the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services.

(Soundbite of press conference)

Mr. PATRICK CRIMMINS (Spokesman, Texas Department of Family and Protective Services): The order is designed to prevent improper communication, tampering with witnesses, and to ensure no outside interference in the attorney-client relationship.

LARGEY: Authorities removed the women and children from the west Texas compound last weekend. They were responding to a complaint from a 16-year-old girl who said she was being physically and sexually abused by her 50-year-old husband.

MARTIN: Matt Largey reporting from Austin. And a big win yesterday for South African golfer Trevor Immelman. He won the Masters Golf Tournament by three strokes over Tiger Woods.

(Soundbite of press conference)

Mr. TREVOR IMMELMAN: (Winner, Masters Golf Tournament): To win a Major while he's playing, and he's playing at his peak - he's told us that he is playing at his peak - it's a hell of an achievement, you know, and I'm not sure if I will ever get it done again, but I'll be trying my best.

MARTIN: It's Immelman's first Major. He is also the first South African to win the green jacket since Gary Player did it 30 years ago. That's the news and it's always online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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