Voices in the News A montage of voices from the week's news, including: Valerie Plame Wilson; Rep. Tom Davis (R-VA); Attorney General Alberto Gonzales; President Bush; Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI); Sen. John Kyl (R-AZ); Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT).
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Ms. VALERIE PLAME WILSON (Former CIA Agent): My name and identity were carelessly and recklessly abused by senior government officials in both the White House and the State Department. All of them understood that I worked for the CIA, and having signed oaths to protect national security secrets, they should have been diligent in protecting me and every CIA officer.

Representative TOM DAVIS (Republican, Virginia): So this looks to me more like a CIA problem than a White House problem. If the agency doesn't take sufficient precautions to protect the identity of those who engaged in covert work, no one else can do it for them.

Attorney General ALBERTO GONZALES (U.S. Justice Department): I acknowledge that "mistakes were made" here. I accept that responsibility, and my pledge to the American people is to find out what went wrong here, to assess accountability, and to make improvements so that the mistakes that occurred in this instance do not occur again in the future.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: He's right, "mistakes were made." And I'm frankly not happy about it.

Senator CARL LEVIN (Democrat, Michigan): Understand what's at stake here. Eight U.S. attorneys who did not play ball with the political agenda of the administration were dropped from the team. We have a right to ask why. We have a right to ask what that political agenda was.

Senator JON KYL (Republican, Arizona): If it is okay to fire 93 effective, presumably, U.S. attorneys and put your own team in, why isn't okay after six years to replace a handful of those people because you don't think that they any longer serve your interests?

Senator PATRICK LEAHY (Democrat, Vermont): But I want people to know if I do not get their cooperation, I will subpoena. We will have testimony under oath before this committee. We'll have the chance for both Republicans and Democrats to ask questions, and we'll find out what happened.

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