Beloved Gator's Body and Insides Go on Display Oscar the alligator charmed generations of tourists at the Okefenokee Swamp Park — and will continue to be an attraction after his death. His skeleton will soon go on display at a museum, along with some of the things found inside him: a dog collar and tags, some spare change and part of a flagpole.
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Beloved Gator's Body and Insides Go on Display

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Beloved Gator's Body and Insides Go on Display

Beloved Gator's Body and Insides Go on Display

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

When he was swimming and lurking in the Okefenokee Swamp Park, Oscar the alligator charmed generations of tourists. When Oscar died last year, he was 1,000 pounds and about 100 years old. And he will continue to be a tourist attraction. His skeleton will soon go on display at a museum, along with him some of the things found inside Oscar: a dog collar and tags, some spare change and part of a flagpole.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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