Sunday Puzzle: Famous Names Don Bottomley of Beaverton, Ore. plays the puzzle with puzzlemaster Will Shortz and NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro.
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Sunday Puzzle: Famous Names

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Sunday Puzzle: Famous Names

Sunday Puzzle: Famous Names

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Hey there, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So what was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah. It came from listener Alan Hochbaum of Duluth, Ga. I said, think of a famous living American whose first and last names have a total of eight letters - all different. Five of these letters are consecutive in the alphabet. The remaining three can be rearranged to spell a woman's nickname. What famous American is this? Well, the answer is Elon Musk - has K, L, M, N and O, plus Sue. There was an interesting alternative answer that a lot of people send in - Jim Kelly, former NFL quarterback. His name has I, J, K, L and M, plus the man's name Eli.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received nearly 800 correct responses. And the winner is Don Bottomley of Beaverton, Ore.

Congratulations.

DON BOTTOMLEY: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So how'd you figure it out?

BOTTOMLEY: It's one of those ones that just popped into my head almost immediately after the question was asked.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And where were you when you got the call? And what did you think?

BOTTOMLEY: I was down at my local Elks Lodge doing a little maintenance. And I was just very surprised. I had forgotten about it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) Fair enough. Are you ready to play The Puzzle?

BOTTOMLEY: I am.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right, Don. Every answer today is the name of a famous person whose first initial and last name, in order, spell a word. For example, take Benjamin Rush, signer of the Declaration of Independence. The B of Benjamin, plus his last name, spells brush. I'll give you clues to the part. You give me the names.

BOTTOMLEY: OK.

SHORTZ: Here's number one. An Oscar-winning actor - 3, 5 - and makes an expression of appreciation.

BOTTOMLEY: Claps.

SHORTZ: You're - what's an expression of appreciation? What do you say in six letters?

BOTTOMLEY: Thanks.

SHORTZ: There you go. And who does that make?

BOTTOMLEY: Tom Hanks.

SHORTZ: Tom Hanks is it. Good. Number two - a singer with The Supremes - 5, 4 - and the word is worthless stuff.

BOTTOMLEY: Diana Ross.

SHORTZ: That's it. Former baseball star - 4,4 - writing that's not poetry.

BOTTOMLEY: Pete Rose.

SHORTZ: That's it - prose. Comedian and former host of the Oscars - 5, 4 - an earthenware pot.

BOTTOMLEY: Not getting it.

SHORTZ: Sort of an irreverent comedian, although maybe that's redundant.

BOTTOMLEY: Going to need some help here, I think.

SHORTZ: What if I told you the first initial is C for an earthenware pot?

BOTTOMLEY: Chris Rock - crock.

SHORTZ: Chris Rock is it. Good. Singer with the group Hole - 8, 4 - and a garlic bulb.

BOTTOMLEY: Courtney Love - clove.

SHORTZ: Nice. Old-time comedian with a radio show - 4, 5 - opposite of risen. What's the opposite of risen?

BOTTOMLEY: A bed doesn't fit.

SHORTZ: (Laughter) That's good.

BOTTOMLEY: Unleavened - no.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It happens to angels when they end up in hell.

SHORTZ: There you go. Good clue. And there's that old expression. I've blank, and I can't get up.

BOTTOMLEY: Fallen - Fred Allen.

SHORTZ: Fred Allen - good one. It came to you. And here's your last one - co-star of "Desperate Housewives" - 4,7 - former British prime minister.

BOTTOMLEY: I never watched that show.

SHORTZ: It's an actress whose name you know. And the former British prime minister is the first female prime minister in Britain. And her first name was Margaret.

BOTTOMLEY: Margaret Thatcher.

SHORTZ: Yes. And so who's the co-star of "Desperate Housewives"? You got all the letters - T and Hatcher. What's her first name?

BOTTOMLEY: Teri Hatcher.

SHORTZ: Teri Hatcher - you got it.

BOTTOMLEY: Boy.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job. How do you feel? That was a hard one.

BOTTOMLEY: Yeah. It's different. I liked it.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Don, which member station do you listen to?

BOTTOMLEY: KOPB.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Don Bottomley of Beaverton, Ore.

Thank you so much for playing The Puzzle.

BOTTOMLEY: All right. Thank you. I had a good time.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I'm so glad. All right, Will. What is next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it comes from listener Barbara Weinstein of Lincoln, Mass. Think of a famous living person in the entertainment field whose first name is a bird. The person's last name is a quality of this bird, something its feathers have. Who's the famous person, and what's the bird? So again, famous living person in entertainment field - first name is a bird. Last name is a quality of this bird, something its feathers have. Who's the famous person, and what's the bird?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, August 13, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's very own puzzlemaster Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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