Letters: Fumarase, Primary, Autistic Son Listeners respond to stories about fumarase, a genetic disease afflicting children living in a polygamist community; commentaries on the primary process and clothes dryers; and Donald Rosenstein's "This I Believe" essay about his autistic son.
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Letters: Fumarase, Primary, Autistic Son

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Letters: Fumarase, Primary, Autistic Son

Letters: Fumarase, Primary, Autistic Son

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Now to your letters, and several of you wrote in about my conversation with investigative reporter John Dougherty about Fumarase Deficiency. It's a genetic disease that has afflicted some of the children living in a polygamist community in Arizona. In Texas, officials recently removed hundreds of children from a compound run by the same group.

Thanks so much for the story on Fumarase and helping to get the word out, wrote Maria Riddlebach(ph) of New York City. We need investigative reporting like yours to keep the story in front of the news.

We also received lots of mail about NPR senior analyst Daniel Schorr's essay supporting a national presidential primary. Amen, Brother Daniel, wrote Jennings Highleague(ph) of Newport, Virginia. It's time to have one single national primary election day - get it over and done with and let's move on with getting a president elected.

One note about our This I Believe essay by Dr. Donald Rosenstein. He said he suspected his young son had autism when he saw him exhibit arm-flapping behavior. Rosenstein and series producer Jay Allison clarified that many healthy young children occasionally wave their arms in excitement. They pointed out that autism can't be diagnosed based on any single symptom.

Lots of you criticized Diane Roberts' essay about the right to dry your clothes on a clothesline in your own backyard. Gretchen Woods of Wenatchee, Washington put it vividly.

Ms. GRETCHEN WOODS (Caller): This morning's naval gazing offering on the subject of clotheslines provoked the opposite of the driveway moment. A window moment wherein I am seized with a near uncontrollable urge to rip the radio out and throw it out the window to make it stop.

Your poor downtrodden oppressed dweller of suburbia can't find anything to whine about beyond the neighbor's clothesline? Where do you find these people?

HANSEN: Laura Bordenkecher(ph) of Franklin, Indiana, had a more gentle reaction to Diane's comments on the right-to-dry movement.

Ms. LAURA BORDENKECHER (Caller): I am a lifelong member of the line-drying club. My mother never has had, and probably never will have, a tumble dryer. I married into a dryer but as long as I'm doing the laundry, it doesn't get used. I've been spreading the gospel of line drying and I hope Ms. Roberts' essay helps my cause along. I proudly display my sheets and towels and T-shirts and socks and so far the property values of my neighborhood are holding steady.

HANSEN: If something on our program leaves you feeling fluffed or starched, let us know. Visit our Web page, NPR.org, and click on the link that says Contact Us. And remember you can share your thoughts about the election online at our new Sunday Soapbox. Check out what our bloggers are saying and post your own comments. Go to NPR.org/SundaySoapbox.

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HANSEN: This is NPR News.

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