Fear of Aftershock Keeps Chinese Outdoors Warnings of a major aftershock sent residents around Chengdu in southwest China outside overnight. Eight days after a powerful earthquake killed thousands, many people slept outside, piling into a soccer stadium, or in cars parked along highways.
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Fear of Aftershock Keeps Chinese Outdoors

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Fear of Aftershock Keeps Chinese Outdoors

Fear of Aftershock Keeps Chinese Outdoors

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Now, aid workers speak of a second disaster for people in Myanmar. And people in China are trying to avoid a second disaster. Officials warned of a possible major aftershock to last week's earthquake.

NPR's Melissa Block is in Chengdu and saw what happened after that warning.

MELISSA BLOCK: People heard this, they grabbed pillows, they grabbed tents, they grabbed straw mats and they all headed outdoors to sleep right next door to our hotel at a soccer stadium. They're sleeping on the parking lot, on grass strips where they can find them, playing cards, drinking beer - everybody seeming to have no problem falling asleep in the middle of this sort of chaotic scene. A lot of people got in their cars, parked along the highway. Just nobody wanted to be in their house with this fear of aftershocks. And that fear is continuing now, you know, eight days after the earthquake.

INSKEEP: That's NPR's Melissa Block in southwestern China, where that earthquake eight days ago killed many thousands of people.

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